Concerning Johnny Boone…

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December 19, 2017, John Robert Boone, “Johnny Boone”, plead guilty to possession of more than 1000 marijuana plants, and to trafficking in Washington County Kentucky.  He was known as the “Godfather of Grass” and the leader of the “Cornbread Mafia” in Marion County Kentucky.

 U.S. District Judge Charles R. Simpson III in Louisville sentenced John Robert “Johnny” Boone, 74, formerly of Marion County, Kentucky, to 57 months.

He had previously fled to Canada for a number of years after having a grow operation spotted by the KSP near Springfield Kentucky in 2008 where he remained a fugitive until his arrest in 2016 when he was deported from Canada back to Kentucky.

On April 11th I received the first email from Johnny Boone’s niece regarding the conditions that her Uncle was living in while being incarcerated at the Elkton Federal Prison, located in Lisbon, Ohio.

He was due to be transferred to a “Half-Way” house on April 15th, but COVID-19 came into the picture and his release was postponed.  He is 76 years old and in in a setting that could cause him to lose his life to this horrid virus. 

His family is pleading for his release, and have done everything they can to attain it.  They are asking for our help! He could very well lose his life in this prison because of this Virus, and nobody seems to be acting fast enough to take care of the emergent situation, in regards to prisoner’s.  He is not the only one!  There are many more all over the Country and each State’s Citizen’s should inform their Governor’s that this is not acceptable!

If you remove the non-violent offenders from the system there will be much more room for the ones who do need to be contained, and there will be better medical care afforded to them – hopefully.

We’re not criminals, we’re not,” he said. “We’re not the kind of people who go out and harm people.”

On April 8, the National Guard arrived at Elkton Federal Prison in Columbiana County to assist the medical staff when a large number of prisoners became ill with the virus.[67] On April 18, the National Guard and Highway Patrol arrived at the state prison in Marion county to assist with “mission critical functions” after infections of correctional workers and prisoners.[68] By April 19, over 1800 prisoners at Marion Correctional Institution, approximately 3/4ths of the population, plus 100 staff had tested positive.[69] Overall, the prison system had almost 2500 cases by April 19, representing almost a fifth of Ohio’s cases.[69]

How Johnny Boone ended up in an Ohio Correctional Facility, instead of a Kentucky Facility is not known.  But regardless of that fact, he should have been transferred back to Kentucky, at the very least, when this outbreak began.  Now it seems that he is stuck in there with no recourse as the Virus continues to reek havoc on the prison industrial complex overall.

Why has Governor Beshear let this happen?  Although I understand the way that we were hit with this “attack” of the Virus it would have to be hard to manage it, but these people who are incarcerated are supposed to be properly cared for by the “System”. 

Even the most chronic or hardened inmates have basic rights that are protected by the U.S. Constitution. If you are facing incarceration, or if you have a family member or friend who is in prison or jail, you should know about inmates’ rights.

Considering Johnny Boone’s age and medical status, he should have been released early on.  There is absolutely no reason to keep this man incarcerated. 

Since Barr’s memorandum on April 3 directing Bureau of Prisons Director Michael Carvajal to consider measures to move minimum security inmates out of prison, few inmates have actually been released with the exception of those who were already planned for release.

With the following information in mind, I am urging everyone to send a memo to Gov. Beshear to request that he step in and make a decision to have Johnny Boone removed from Elkton Correctional Institute immediately and brought back home to Kentucky!

 On April 13, 2020, inmates at Elkton Federal Correctional Institution, brought an emergency court action seeking release from Elkton due to the spread of COVID-19 within the prison (Reference United States District Court Northern District of Ohio, Craig Wilson, et v Mark Williams, et al, Case: 4:20-cv-00794). The action sought the release of some inmates from prison to Home Confinement or by Furlough, particularly those who were old or had an underlying conditions consistent with the guidelines provided by the Center for Decision Control. Noted in the lawsuit was the “dorm-style” design of most minimum and low prisons where inmates live in close proximity to one another.

Please do not let either Johnny Boone or any other Inmates suffer and die needlessly in such condition!

This is the Government’s responsibility to keep these people safe from harm as they serve their time.  There is no reason to keep a non-violent offender in a prison system in these conditions!

Please take this into consideration and free Johnny Boone to his family!

Governor Andy Beshear

700 Capitol Avenue, Suite 100
Frankfort, Kentucky 40601

Main Line: (502) 564-2611
Fax: (502) 564-2517

SEND EMAIL ONLINE THRU THIS LINK!

Joe Keith Bickett- Author: Cornbread Mafia Origins to Outlaws

RELATED:

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.wordpress.com/?s=Johnny+Boone

https://governor.ky.gov/contact/contact-us

https://www.forbes.com/sites/walterpavlo/2020/04/23/federal-judge-in-ohio-says-fci-elkton-meets-cruel-and-unusual-punishment-standard/?fbclid=IwAR1n2U-S6F_F08Fa1jSVoq7xGm74aMZoILNp77s9tCAGVuRUg3LCcMvKZm8#1f906b2a20d4

https://civilrights.findlaw.com/other-constitutional-rights/rights-of-inmates.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impact_of_the_COVID-19_pandemic_on_prisons#Ohio

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12926917-the-cornbread-mafia

https://www.kentucky.com/news/local/crime/article159441349.html

https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/godfather-of-grass-sentenced-to-57-months-in-prison-1.3845091

https://www.lebanonenterprise.com/content/johnny-boone-pleads-guilty

https://cavecitykentucky.wordpress.com/2017/04/05/legendary-pot-grower-johnny-boone-leader-of-kentuckys-cornbread-mafia-back-in-u-s/

https://www.civilized.life/articles/the-godfather-of-grass-deported-from-canada-to-the-u-s/

http://www.corizonhealth.com/Corizon-News/connections/landmark-case-guarantees-prisoners-the-right-to-medical-care

Hospital to begin treating virus patients with cannabis | The Times of Israel

Hospital to begin treating virus patients with cannabis | The Times of … 23 hours ago … Ichilov Medical Center will begin administering medicinal cannabis to coronavirus patients in moderate condition, as part of an experimental …

Jerusalem


Hospital to begin treating virus patients with cannabis

Ichilov Medical Center will begin administering medicinal cannabis to coronavirus patients in moderate condition, as part of an experimental treatment, Channel 12 reports.

Doctors are seeking to use the antiviral properties of cannabis to slow the spread of the virus, it says.

Evidently the Newspaper decided not to keep this information available to the general public because when I followed the link the story is non-existent.

However, I’m sure everyone can get the general idea of what is going on here.

There are many valuable medical treatments that Cannabis can be used for.  Now is the time to start using them.

https://www.timesofisrael.com/search/?q=treat+covid+patients+with+cannabis&submit=search

US is first country to start virtual drug tests on Olympic athletes…

US is first country to start virtual drug tests on Olympic athletes like Katie Ledecky, Lilly King

Christine Brennan

In the wake of the national shutdown due to the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has initiated an unprecedented drug-testing program in which top Olympians conduct urine and blood tests in their homes on their own while being observed remotely on Zoom or FaceTime by USADA personnel.

The virtual testing program is the only one of its kind in the world and was begun as USADA’s regular in-person, unannounced drug testing has nearly ground to a halt due to social distancing and other health guidelines during the pandemic, USADA CEO Travis Tygart told USA TODAY Sports in a phone interview Tuesday.

USADA’s decision to initiate the new program comes as many nations have stopped doing any knock-on-the-door, out-of-competition drug testing because of the pandemic, leading to worldwide concerns about undetected cheating in Olympic and international sports, Tygart said. 

Olympic star Katie Ledecky is among U.S. athletes participating in a special at-home drug testing program sponsored by USADA.

Earlier this month, USADA launched Project Believe 2020, inviting more than a dozen elite athletes, including Olympic gold medalists Katie Ledecky and Lilly King, to volunteer in the pilot program to virtually test themselves. The program is expected to last eight weeks.

“I felt very comfortable with the whole process,” said Ledecky, who administered her first test Monday in her Northern California apartment. “This is the perfect time to test something like this. I think it’s great for the circumstances we’re all in right now.”

Testing kits were sent to the athletes, who then must produce samples of their blood and urine when they receive an unannounced call from a USADA doping control officer, Tygart said. The testing is monitored by the officer on Zoom or FaceTime. The athletes then seal the samples and send them via overnight delivery to a World Anti-Doping Agency accredited laboratory for analysis.

The athlete must show the entire blood collection process on video, he said. That’s not the case, however, with urine collection.

During normal, in-person unannounced testing, a doping control officer of the same gender as the athlete is in the room with the athlete and observes the process. This is necessary because, over the years, athletes who were taking performance-enhancing drugs have tried to cheat by bringing a sample of untainted urine into a test and passing it off as their own.

Due to “obvious privacy concerns” over the internet videotaping of an athlete’s urine collection, Tygart said the pilot program has adjusted accordingly. It requires the athlete to show USADA personnel the inside of the bathroom through their phone or laptop, then set the device right outside the door during the collection process.

The doping control officer on the other end of the call keeps track of the time for any irregularities, and there is a monitor in the testing kit that registers the temperature of the sample to guard against the use of a foreign substance.

Tygart said USADA believes that visual observation of the room right before the test, timing the process and checking the temperature of the sample “are strong safeguards against manipulation.”

He added that USADA also can compare the athlete’s urinalysis with previous tests to flag any inconsistencies or irregularities.

“Honestly, I was a little skeptical of it at first,” King said. “Then after I did my first test, I think they really thought through all the potential loopholes with the testing. There are way too many factors that would go into providing a tainted sample for you to really pull that off during the test unless you were a ridiculously high-level crook.”

King said that testing the temperature of the urine is an important step. “When you have a random test, it would be kind of hard to keep a fake sample at a certain temperature for weeks on end before you know that you’re going to have a test.”

Unannounced testing of elite athletes around the world at their homes or training sites is considered the best way to catch those who are cheating, and has become as much a part of a top athlete’s life as training and nutrition. Athletes like Ledecky and King provide details of their whereabouts to USADA 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in order to be able to be located if they have been selected for an unannounced test. Not being available for a drug test can be grounds for suspension.

Ledecky said that in normal times, she is tested randomly with no notice an average of two times a month.

“I’m willing to be tested any day, any time,” she said. “It’s part of sport and part of my responsibility as an elite athlete to be drug tested and to compete clean. It’s something I feel very strongly about.”

She said she has “a little bit of concern” about the lack of drug testing around the world during the pandemic.

“I do have hope it will ramp up in the Olympic year, but it’s a little concerning and I don’t think it will give some athletes the same kind of confidence that they’re competing against clean athletes,” she said. “There’s still so much uncertainty out there about when we will get back to competing and training normally, so of course there’s uncertainty about testing too.”

Volunteering for the USADA pilot program sends an essential message, Ledecky believes.

“I want the people that I’m competing against to know that I’m clean and to feel confident competing against me,” she said. “I want them to know that I have this commitment to clean sport, and I hope they all do too.”

CONTINUE READING…


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The legacy of Manfred Donike

Charlotte Figi, namesake of Charlotte’s Web medical marijuana strain, dies with COVID-19

Image may contain: 1 person, child, outdoor and closeup

Colo. (KRDO) — Charlotte Figi, the little girl who inspired the low-THC medical marijuana strain, “Charlotte’s Web,” has passed away with COVID-19.

Multiple family members tested positive for the virus, said those close to the family.

As of Tuesday, 179 people have died of coronavirus in Colorado, according to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Figi had suffered hundreds of grand mal seizures when her parents, exhausted of heavy-duty drugs, sought out the help of the southern Colorado-based Stanley Brothers, who eventually engineered the non-psychoactive CW Hemp in 2011.

The advent of the CW Hemp plant spurred hundreds of families to flock to Colorado, seeking alternative treatment for a variety of health issues, including seizures, shortly after Colorado legalized medical marijuana.

Figi was just three months old when she started having seizures from Dravet Syndrome. After taking oil from Charlotte’s Web, her seizures reduced to two to three per month.

A Figi family friend Tuesday posted publicly on Facebook, “Charlotte is no longer suffering. She is seizure-free forever.”

The family asked for privacy during this time.

Charlotte Figi was 13.

CONTINUE READING…

1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judge

Patrick Jones “spent the last 12 years contesting a sentence that ultimately killed him,” one of his former lawyers said.

thief-on-the-cross-large

April 5, 2020, 7:35 AM CDT

By Rich Schapiro

In the months before the coronavirus infiltrated the U.S., a 49-year-old inmate began drafting a letter inside the walls of a federal prison in Louisiana.

The man, Patrick Jones, had been locked up for nearly 13 years on a nonviolent drug charge. He hadn’t seen his youngest son, then 16, since the boy was a toddler.

“I feel that my conviction and sentence was also a punishment that my child has had to endure also and there are no words for how remorseful I am,” Jones wrote to U.S. District Judge Alan Albright in a letter dated Oct. 15, 2019. “Years of ‘I am sorry’ don’t seem to justify the absence of a father or the chance of having purpose in life by raising my child.”

Patrick Jones contracted coronavirus at a low-security prison in Oakdale, La.Courtesy of the Jones Family

Jones had been arrested in 2007 after cops found 19 grams of crack and 21 grams of powder cocaine inside the apartment he shared with his wife in Temple, Texas. His wife testified against him and was spared a prison sentence.

Jones wasn’t so fortunate. He was ultimately ordered to spend 27 years behind bars, in part because he lived within 1,000 feet of a junior college and already had a long rap sheet, mostly burglaries that he committed when he was a teenager living on the streets.

He was now writing the judge in the hope of receiving a sentence reduction through the newly-signed First Step Act, which offered relief to some inmates convicted of nonviolent drug crimes.

“My child having his own experience of raising his own child would validate my life experience and give meaning to my existence in this world, because 83582-180 has no meaning,” he wrote, referring to his federal inmate number.

“It is just a number to be forgotten in time. But Mr. Patrick Estell Jones is a very good person. Caring, hard working, free and clean of drugs and a lot smarter now, with a balanced outlook on life.”

The judge denied the request on Feb. 26, 2020. Twenty two days later, Patrick Estell Jones was dead, the first federal inmate to die of the coronavirus.

He had contracted COVID-19 at the low-security prison in Oakdale, La., a penitentiary now dealing with the deadliest outbreak of any of the 122 federal facilities.

“He spent the last 12 years contesting a sentence that ultimately killed him,” said Alison Looman, a New York-based attorney who had represented Jones in an earlier unsuccessful bid for clemency. “Ironically, it seems it is his death that might finally bring his case some attention.”

The U.S. has seen a movement in the past several years to reduce the sentences of nonviolent drug offenders, but criminal justice reform advocates say Jones’s case illustrates the limits of that effort.

“You see everything that is wrong with our sentencing system in this case,” said Kevin Ring, president of the criminal justice advocacy group FAMM.

Ring ticked off the series of factors that led to Jones’s lengthy prison term: a questionable accounting of the amount of drugs he was selling, his apartment’s proximity to a junior college, his decision to go to trial rather than take a plea and a criminal record that was largely made up of teenage offenses.

“He was no choir boy but his life had meaning,” Ring said. “I feel like his life was taken from him when he was sentenced and then he was killed in prison, and both of those things should trouble us.”

Jones’s death also focused attention on the beleaguered prison in southern Louisiana. A total of five Oakdale prisoners have died from COVID-19, officials said, and so many have come down with presumed cases that officials had temporarily stopped testing them for it.

At least 18 inmates and four staffers have tested positive, according to the Bureau of Prisons, but prison union leaders say the numbers are significantly higher.

“You’re just afraid all the time,” said an Oakdale corrections officer, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he’s not authorized to speak to the media. “You’re afraid of catching it and bringing it home to your family. You’re afraid of spreading it in the community.”

The coronavirus pandemic has wreaked havoc on jails and prisons across the country. Earlier this week, the federal Bureau of Prisons announced that it was locking down all inmates in their cells or quarters, with limited exceptions, for 14 days, but new cases keep popping up.

“There’s a feeling of terror not knowing when this is going to end,” the Oakdale staffer said.

Jones arrived at the prison in April 2017. It would be the last stop in a hardscrabble life that began in Temple, Texas.

His childhood was marked by tumult. Jones was initially raised by his great grandmother but he spent much of his pre-teen years at a group home for children and shuffling between relatives and friends, according to his clemency petition and a government court filing quoting an interview with him. He was on and off the streets during his teenage years, the clemency petition says.

His first run-in with the law came when he was 17, court filings say. Jones was arrested twice in the span of two months on theft and burglary charges. He was charged as an adult and ultimately spent two years in prison.

Jones was released in August 1991 but he didn’t stay out of trouble. He was arrested in May 1992 after he sold cocaine to an undercover officer, according to court records. Jones pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison.

He was released on parole in 2000 and eventually settled in an apartment in Temple, a few blocks from the local community college. Temple police officers showed up at his home in January 2007 looking for a woman on an outstanding warrant, court records say.

After discovering crack and powder cocaine inside the residence, they arrested Jones and his wife of two months, Sharon, court documents say.

The woman targeted by police wasn’t at the apartment but she was later taken into custody. The woman, Frances Whitlock, told police she sold crack cocaine for the Joneses, averaging about five to ten deliveries a day and sometimes made as many as 30, court documents say.

Sharon Jones agreed to testify against her husband. At his trial, she testified that they had been selling the drugs for about two months. She said they would sell a half ounce of crack every other day, earning about $1,000 every day, court documents say.

The jury found Patrick Jones guilty of possession with intent to distribute at least 5 grams of crack cocaine. His wife received a term of three years’ probation after the government recommended a reduced sentence citing her cooperation, court filings say.

At his sentencing, Jones was held accountable for 425 grams of crack – 22 times the amount that was in his apartment – based on the testimony from his wife that they sold a half ounce every other day from Thanksgiving 2006 until the day of their arrest in January 2007.

The government also used several other factors to enhance Jones’s sentencing guidelines: his apartment’s proximity to Temple College, his role as an “organizer” of criminal activity for enlisting Whitlock to deliver the drugs, his decision to fight the charges at trial and his offenses when he was 17 and 21.

In the case of his previous arrests, the government treated each charge as a separate sentence, which had the effect of further driving up his sentencing guidelines.

Jones was sentenced to the minimum term under the guidelines, but it was still 30 years. His sentence was later reduced to 27 years after the U.S. Sentencing Commission amended the crack guidelines to reduce the disparity between powder and crack cocaine.

Jones’s younger sister recalled being stunned by the severity of his sentence. “My brother made some bad decisions in life but that doesn’t make him a bad person,” Debra Canady told NBC News.

In the years after his sentencing, she remained in close touch with her brother who wrote frequently, she said, asking for updates on the youngest of his three sons, Kyrell.

Jones filed a bid for clemency in Oct. 2016 pointing to court rulings and changes in sentencing guidelines that would have directly impacted his case. Jones’s lawyers argued that if he were sentenced then he likely would have received a term at least 10 years less than the one he had received.

“With good time credit,” the petition said, “Mr. Jones would have already served his entire sentence.”

The petition noted that he had no history of violence or ties to gangs, had spent his childhood “with no permanent home,” and that he was a model inmate who worked his way up to head baker–”a profession he hopes to pursue upon his release.”

In January 2017, his lawyers received word from the Justice Department’s Office of the Pardon Attorney: the petition was denied.

Looman recalled that when she delivered the news to Jones, he immediately expressed concern about her and wondered aloud if she might lose her job as a result.

“It is a telling example of what a kind and compassionate person Patrick is,” Looman later wrote to his judge.

The First Step Act signed by President Donald Trump in December 2018 offered Jones a glimmer of hope.

In his motion for a sentence reduction under the law, Jones’s lawyers said shaving off years of his prison term would “support the mandate from Congress and President Trump to reduce unnecessarily lengthy sentences for defendants like Mr. Jones.”

Prosecutors took a starkly different position, emphasizing his previous convictions and his “leadership role” in his “‘crack’ distribution enterprise.”

“Jones was not a small time crack dealer whose sentence far outweighed the scope of his criminal activity,” prosecutors said in court papers.

The judge, in a ruling filed in February, sided with the government.

“Jones is a career offender with multiple prior offenses and a history of recidivating each time he is placed on parole,” Albright said in his order.

“Though the bulk of Jones’s offenses were committed at age 17, Jones displayed his continuing criminal tendencies by committing offenses each time he was released from custody.”

Albright couldn’t be reached for comment.

Looman didn’t handle Jones’s effort to get relief through the First Step Act, but she kept in touch with him via the federal prison email system.

“Happy New Year to you and may this year bring great things your way,” Jones wrote to her this past New Year’s Eve.

On Feb. 27, the day after the judge’s ruling, Jones sent her a message that made it clear he had yet to get the news.

“I’ve just been awaiting to hear something good for a change as far as legal issues go,” Jones wrote. “…But I have not got anymore info to what may be coming forth It’s been a lot of movement around here lately I hope I’m in the making for that kind of release also.”

The following month, Jones and Looman exchanged messages that referenced the coronavirus. The deadly illness was sweeping across the U.S. and there were escalating concerns of outbreaks inside detention facilities.

“I am doing well as fare (sic) as coronavirus goes and staying safe and healthy,” Jones wrote on March 14, five days before he would complain to Oakdale staffers about a persistent cough, according to federal prison officials.

He went on to say in his message to Looman that he found out the judge ruled against him, which was news even to Looman, and he revealed why it took him so long to get word: his lawyer had left the public defender’s office two months earlier.

“I talked to the head person and he said it was on him that I was not contacted and that he was going to get his people on top of the appeal,” Jones wrote. “…Anyway, enough about my problems. Are you likening (sic) the work from home thing?”

Looman replied a few days later.

She never heard back.

Rich Schapiro

Rich Schapiro is a reporter for the NBC News Investigative Unit.

CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO….

1st federal inmate to die of coronavirus wrote heartbreaking letter to judge

Patrick Jones “spent the last 12 years contesting a sentence that ultimately killed him,” one of his former lawyers said.

thief-on-the-cross-large

April 5, 2020, 7:35 AM CDT

By Rich Schapiro

In the months before the coronavirus infiltrated the U.S., a 49-year-old inmate began drafting a letter inside the walls of a federal prison in Louisiana.

The man, Patrick Jones, had been locked up for nearly 13 years on a nonviolent drug charge. He hadn’t seen his youngest son, then 16, since the boy was a toddler.

“I feel that my conviction and sentence was also a punishment that my child has had to endure also and there are no words for how remorseful I am,” Jones wrote to U.S. District Judge Alan Albright in a letter dated Oct. 15, 2019. “Years of ‘I am sorry’ don’t seem to justify the absence of a father or the chance of having purpose in life by raising my child.”

Patrick Jones contracted coronavirus at a low-security prison in Oakdale, La.Courtesy of the Jones Family

Jones had been arrested in 2007 after cops found 19 grams of crack and 21 grams of powder cocaine inside the apartment he shared with his wife in Temple, Texas. His wife testified against him and was spared a prison sentence.

Jones wasn’t so fortunate. He was ultimately ordered to spend 27 years behind bars, in part because he lived within 1,000 feet of a junior college and already had a long rap sheet, mostly burglaries that he committed when he was a teenager living on the streets.

He was now writing the judge in the hope of receiving a sentence reduction through the newly-signed First Step Act, which offered relief to some inmates convicted of nonviolent drug crimes.

“My child having his own experience of raising his own child would validate my life experience and give meaning to my existence in this world, because 83582-180 has no meaning,” he wrote, referring to his federal inmate number.

“It is just a number to be forgotten in time. But Mr. Patrick Estell Jones is a very good person. Caring, hard working, free and clean of drugs and a lot smarter now, with a balanced outlook on life.”

The judge denied the request on Feb. 26, 2020. Twenty two days later, Patrick Estell Jones was dead, the first federal inmate to die of the coronavirus.

He had contracted COVID-19 at the low-security prison in Oakdale, La., a penitentiary now dealing with the deadliest outbreak of any of the 122 federal facilities.

“He spent the last 12 years contesting a sentence that ultimately killed him,” said Alison Looman, a New York-based attorney who had represented Jones in an earlier unsuccessful bid for clemency. “Ironically, it seems it is his death that might finally bring his case some attention.”

The U.S. has seen a movement in the past several years to reduce the sentences of nonviolent drug offenders, but criminal justice reform advocates say Jones’s case illustrates the limits of that effort.

“You see everything that is wrong with our sentencing system in this case,” said Kevin Ring, president of the criminal justice advocacy group FAMM.

Ring ticked off the series of factors that led to Jones’s lengthy prison term: a questionable accounting of the amount of drugs he was selling, his apartment’s proximity to a junior college, his decision to go to trial rather than take a plea and a criminal record that was largely made up of teenage offenses.

“He was no choir boy but his life had meaning,” Ring said. “I feel like his life was taken from him when he was sentenced and then he was killed in prison, and both of those things should trouble us.”

Jones’s death also focused attention on the beleaguered prison in southern Louisiana. A total of five Oakdale prisoners have died from COVID-19, officials said, and so many have come down with presumed cases that officials had temporarily stopped testing them for it.

At least 18 inmates and four staffers have tested positive, according to the Bureau of Prisons, but prison union leaders say the numbers are significantly higher.

“You’re just afraid all the time,” said an Oakdale corrections officer, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he’s not authorized to speak to the media. “You’re afraid of catching it and bringing it home to your family. You’re afraid of spreading it in the community.”

The coronavirus pandemic has wreaked havoc on jails and prisons across the country. Earlier this week, the federal Bureau of Prisons announced that it was locking down all inmates in their cells or quarters, with limited exceptions, for 14 days, but new cases keep popping up.

“There’s a feeling of terror not knowing when this is going to end,” the Oakdale staffer said.

Jones arrived at the prison in April 2017. It would be the last stop in a hardscrabble life that began in Temple, Texas.

His childhood was marked by tumult. Jones was initially raised by his great grandmother but he spent much of his pre-teen years at a group home for children and shuffling between relatives and friends, according to his clemency petition and a government court filing quoting an interview with him. He was on and off the streets during his teenage years, the clemency petition says.

His first run-in with the law came when he was 17, court filings say. Jones was arrested twice in the span of two months on theft and burglary charges. He was charged as an adult and ultimately spent two years in prison.

Jones was released in August 1991 but he didn’t stay out of trouble. He was arrested in May 1992 after he sold cocaine to an undercover officer, according to court records. Jones pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison.

He was released on parole in 2000 and eventually settled in an apartment in Temple, a few blocks from the local community college. Temple police officers showed up at his home in January 2007 looking for a woman on an outstanding warrant, court records say.

After discovering crack and powder cocaine inside the residence, they arrested Jones and his wife of two months, Sharon, court documents say.

The woman targeted by police wasn’t at the apartment but she was later taken into custody. The woman, Frances Whitlock, told police she sold crack cocaine for the Joneses, averaging about five to ten deliveries a day and sometimes made as many as 30, court documents say.

Sharon Jones agreed to testify against her husband. At his trial, she testified that they had been selling the drugs for about two months. She said they would sell a half ounce of crack every other day, earning about $1,000 every day, court documents say.

The jury found Patrick Jones guilty of possession with intent to distribute at least 5 grams of crack cocaine. His wife received a term of three years’ probation after the government recommended a reduced sentence citing her cooperation, court filings say.

At his sentencing, Jones was held accountable for 425 grams of crack – 22 times the amount that was in his apartment – based on the testimony from his wife that they sold a half ounce every other day from Thanksgiving 2006 until the day of their arrest in January 2007.

The government also used several other factors to enhance Jones’s sentencing guidelines: his apartment’s proximity to Temple College, his role as an “organizer” of criminal activity for enlisting Whitlock to deliver the drugs, his decision to fight the charges at trial and his offenses when he was 17 and 21.

In the case of his previous arrests, the government treated each charge as a separate sentence, which had the effect of further driving up his sentencing guidelines.

Jones was sentenced to the minimum term under the guidelines, but it was still 30 years. His sentence was later reduced to 27 years after the U.S. Sentencing Commission amended the crack guidelines to reduce the disparity between powder and crack cocaine.

Jones’s younger sister recalled being stunned by the severity of his sentence. “My brother made some bad decisions in life but that doesn’t make him a bad person,” Debra Canady told NBC News.

In the years after his sentencing, she remained in close touch with her brother who wrote frequently, she said, asking for updates on the youngest of his three sons, Kyrell.

Jones filed a bid for clemency in Oct. 2016 pointing to court rulings and changes in sentencing guidelines that would have directly impacted his case. Jones’s lawyers argued that if he were sentenced then he likely would have received a term at least 10 years less than the one he had received.

“With good time credit,” the petition said, “Mr. Jones would have already served his entire sentence.”

The petition noted that he had no history of violence or ties to gangs, had spent his childhood “with no permanent home,” and that he was a model inmate who worked his way up to head baker–”a profession he hopes to pursue upon his release.”

In January 2017, his lawyers received word from the Justice Department’s Office of the Pardon Attorney: the petition was denied.

Looman recalled that when she delivered the news to Jones, he immediately expressed concern about her and wondered aloud if she might lose her job as a result.

“It is a telling example of what a kind and compassionate person Patrick is,” Looman later wrote to his judge.

The First Step Act signed by President Donald Trump in December 2018 offered Jones a glimmer of hope.

In his motion for a sentence reduction under the law, Jones’s lawyers said shaving off years of his prison term would “support the mandate from Congress and President Trump to reduce unnecessarily lengthy sentences for defendants like Mr. Jones.”

Prosecutors took a starkly different position, emphasizing his previous convictions and his “leadership role” in his “‘crack’ distribution enterprise.”

“Jones was not a small time crack dealer whose sentence far outweighed the scope of his criminal activity,” prosecutors said in court papers.

The judge, in a ruling filed in February, sided with the government.

“Jones is a career offender with multiple prior offenses and a history of recidivating each time he is placed on parole,” Albright said in his order.

“Though the bulk of Jones’s offenses were committed at age 17, Jones displayed his continuing criminal tendencies by committing offenses each time he was released from custody.”

Albright couldn’t be reached for comment.

Looman didn’t handle Jones’s effort to get relief through the First Step Act, but she kept in touch with him via the federal prison email system.

“Happy New Year to you and may this year bring great things your way,” Jones wrote to her this past New Year’s Eve.

On Feb. 27, the day after the judge’s ruling, Jones sent her a message that made it clear he had yet to get the news.

“I’ve just been awaiting to hear something good for a change as far as legal issues go,” Jones wrote. “…But I have not got anymore info to what may be coming forth It’s been a lot of movement around here lately I hope I’m in the making for that kind of release also.”

The following month, Jones and Looman exchanged messages that referenced the coronavirus. The deadly illness was sweeping across the U.S. and there were escalating concerns of outbreaks inside detention facilities.

“I am doing well as fare (sic) as coronavirus goes and staying safe and healthy,” Jones wrote on March 14, five days before he would complain to Oakdale staffers about a persistent cough, according to federal prison officials.

He went on to say in his message to Looman that he found out the judge ruled against him, which was news even to Looman, and he revealed why it took him so long to get word: his lawyer had left the public defender’s office two months earlier.

“I talked to the head person and he said it was on him that I was not contacted and that he was going to get his people on top of the appeal,” Jones wrote. “…Anyway, enough about my problems. Are you likening (sic) the work from home thing?”

Looman replied a few days later.

She never heard back.

Rich Schapiro

Rich Schapiro is a reporter for the NBC News Investigative Unit.

CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO….

(MO)”Bill” If passed, it would allow employers to drug test their employees randomly and grant them the clearance to fire them if they fail.

Missouri bill seeks to allow employers to test for medical marijuana

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ST. LOUIS – Whether it’s medical or reactional marijuana, both are proving to be a hot topic in many states across the United States.

In Illinois, since legalizing the drug for both uses at the start of 2020, the state rang in an eye-opening $40 million in just the first month.

And in Missouri, the initial steps of setting up shops for medical marijuana are just now being put into place.

“The good thing is that we do have [medical marijuana] in Missouri,” said Gary Easter, a marijuana advocate with The Green Man Group. “So we have to look at that as a positive and keep fighting the good fight.”

While strides are moving forward, there’s new legislation on medical marijuana that’s raising some eyebrows in Jefferson City.

It’s called Senate Bill 610 and its sponsored by Republican Senator David Sater from southwest Missouri.

If passed, it would allow employers to drug test their employees randomly and grant them the clearance to fire them if they fail.

“I feel like this bill is continue to stigma that has been placed on marijuana and medical marijuana users,” said Abrahama Keys, the executive director of NORML, a support group that lobbies for the legalization of marijuana on all fronts.

She assures the senator’s bill is nothing more than a distraction on Missouri’s progression of marijuana legalization.

“When you make legislation like this, you’re almost criminalizing people who are medical marijuana users,” Keys said. “We don’t have anything that tests for, say, sleeping drugs; sleeping drugs can impair you on the job. However, there’s no test in place or legislature in place.”

Though she doesn’t agree with the bill, Keys says she welcomes all dialogue.

“I believe when things like this come in the light, it’s important to view everybody’s opinions,” Keys said.

“It’s baby steps,” Easter said. “Just baby step before getting to the ultimate picture which is legalization across the board.”

At present, the bill is in the Small Business and Industry Committee, where it failed to gather enough votes last year.

CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO!

Be Careful When You Ask For “MORE”…

(Next, it could/will be your vegetables…)

Congress Plans to Vote on Federal Cannabis Legalization This Week

The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act would de-schedule cannabis and create a government agency tasked with righting the wrongs of prohibition.

BRUCE CAIN

2.17.2020

It does take Cannabis off the Controlled Substances Act which is a good thing.

What we never seem to hear from our representatives or within this MORE Bill is an explicit acknowledgement of the inalienable right for adults to grow: no tax, regulation or gov’t/globalist control. And nowhere in this bill does it do that.

I’m an old Perennial Hippie who has been fighting for the right to grow for many decades. And over those decades I have had the honor of knowing many great activists: Jack Herer, Timothy Leary, Gatewood Galbraith, Dennis Peron and hundreds of others.

Well before the establishment of the UN the Rockefeller’s and Rothschild’s have been diametrically opposed to Cannabis. The UN, which is really a front for these two dynasties, is still against an individual’s right to grow.

To me it symbolizes the chasm between the two major ideologies: individualism Vs collectivism. It also symbolizes the chasm between self sufficiency Vs dependency. What is really at the heart of these dynasties is power: the aspiration to control everything and everybody.

This idea of self sufficiency is the idealized goal of our founders and is the real primary reason that I spent over 30 years of my life advocating the inalienable right to grow your own. Today the biggest threat to individual self sufficiency is the UN and their fait accompli to usher us into the 4th Industrial Revolution through 5G infrastructure: Smart Cities, Smart Grids, Smart Meters etc.

Cannabis growers need to understand that — once this infrastructure is in place — they can easily take away your right to grow and make you entirely dependent on spending $15/gram at the dispensary. Smart Meters will detect your indoor grows. Drones, coupled with infrared scanners and AI, can ferret out your outdoor garden.

Cannabis legalization was always a symptom of a much larger evil: global collectivists such as the Rockefeller’s, the Rothschild’s and the globalist United Nations façade which they created. Sadly the war on Cannabis is not over: it has really just begun. They want to control Cannabis just as they want to control You and I. They are responsible for the Federal Reserve (that has been robbing us blind since 1913), they are responsible for nearly every war since 1900 and they look at us as either “useful idiots” (AOC, proponents of the New Green Deal: Agenda21 by another name) and “useless eaters.” And the funny thing about all of this is that we are not taught this through the public education system. The fact is they control that as well. Perhaps THIS is the time to stand up against these demonic forces? Because once the 5G infrastructure is “up and running” we may well remain slaves forever. And as slaves you will eventually not be able to grow your own. They have never changed their view on that one.

https://www.congress.gov/…/116th-congr…/house-bill/3884/text

https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/3884/all-actions?overview=closed&KWICView=false

REMEMBER! MARK YOUR CALENDAR! MARCH 11TH, 2020; Cannabis Rally In The Rotunda–FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY.

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RotundaRally3.11.20

MARCH 11TH, 2020

12:30 PM – 2:00 PM

CAPITOL ROTUNDA

700 CAPITOL AVENUE

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY  40601

We will be discussing the progress we have made, current legislation, and what folks can do to help end the prohibition against this life-saving plant.
All advocates, and all parties, are welcomed!
If interested in speaking about your cannabis bill, or a bill you have sponsored, please PM us, or leave a comment below and we will reach out to you.
We hope to see y’all there!!
If you are a CBD store owner, cannabis farmer, cannabis processor, or you sell cannabis products in Kentucky and you plan to be at the rally, please leave a comment below so folks know to look for you.

ANY QUESTIONS?  CONTACT DAN SEUM AT THIS LINK!

Kentucky House Judiciary Committee advances medical cannabis bill! (hb136)

Kentucky House Judiciary Committee advances medical cannabis bill!

Seriously ill Kentuckians have been waiting long enough — urge your state legislators to support HB 136!

Today, Kentucky’s House Judiciary Committee voted 17-1 to pass HB 136, a bill that would legalize cannabis for medical use. Next the bill will proceed to the full House, where it is expected to receive a vote soon.

Please write your legislators today and urge them to pass this compassionate legislation!

Fifty-one of Kentucky’s 100 state representatives are cosponsors of HB 136, and Gov. Andy Beshear has indicated that he strongly supports medical cannabis.

However, some Senate leaders remain opposed, so the challenge for advocates will be getting a bill through both chambers of the legislature and to the governor’s desk.

It’s critical that legislators hear from their constituents who support medical cannabis. After you write your legislators, please share this message with your friends and family.

CONTINUE READING…

STOP SIGN

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT HB136 IS A NON SMOKABLE NON GROWABLE BILL!  IT IS STRICTLY FOR MEDICAL CONSUMPTION ONLY!

“to prohibit smoking of medicinal marijuana;”

“to establish limits on the THC content of medicinal marijuana that can be produced or sold in the state”

“to exempt certain records and information from the disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act;”

“to permit an employer to restrict the possession and use of medicinal marijuana by an employee;”

GO

Sen. Perry Clark introduced SB105 on January 22, 2020 which DOES include adult use, small amounts of growing for personal use as well. Please view the Bill at this link!

“to allow for possession, growth, use, processing, purchasing, transfer, and consumption of cannabis;”

“to establish provisions for personal cultivation;”

“to establish provisions for palliative or therapeutic use of cannabis by persons under the age of 21;”



https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2019/12/19/2020-kentucky-marijuana-bills/

KENTUCKY CANNABIS RALLY AT THE ROTUNDA IN FRANKFORT!

The people of Kentucky, all groups, all BILLS for Cannabis whether it be “Medical” or “Adult Use”, Republican, Democrat, Libertarian or Independent, are requested to join us in Frankfort Kentucky on March 11, 2020 to show our support for the effort in our State!

Please plan to be there!

RotundaRally3.11.20

LOCATED AT CAPITOL ROTUNDA

700 CAPITOL AVE

FRANKFORT, KY  40601

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/19rs/hb136.html

AN ACT relating to medicinal marijuana and making an appropriation therefor.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb148.html

AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb236.html

AN ACT relating to hemp and declaring an emergency.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb221.html

AN ACT relating to marijuana possession.

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/hb102.html

AN ACT relating to employment-related drug screens.

RELATED GROUPS/PAGES ON FACEBOOK!

MY RIGHT TO DECIDE

https://www.facebook.com/MYRIGHTTODECIDE/

KY4MM

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ky4mm/?ref=br_rs

KENTUCKY 411 UNCENSORED

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2091597957797912/

KENTUCKY MARIJUANA PARTY

https://www.facebook.com/USMjPartyKY/?ref=br_rs

FREE THE WEED KENTUCKY

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1428715180676475/?ref=br_rs

Trump Says He Can Ignore Medical Marijuana Protections Passed By Congress

President Trump Signs VA Accountability Act

December 21, 2019

Tom Angell

Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

In a statement attached to a large-scale funding bill he signed into law on Friday, President Trump said in effect that he reserves the right to ignore a congressionally approved provision that seeks to protect state medical marijuana laws from federal interference.

Division B, section 531 of the Act provides that the Department of Justice may not use any funds made available under this Act to prevent implementation of medical marijuana laws by various States and territories,” Trump wrote in a signing statement. “My Administration will treat this provision consistent with the President’s constitutional responsibility to faithfully execute the laws of the United States.”

Although the vague language doesn’t directly say he plans to ignore Congress’s will to block Justice Department prosecution of medical cannabis patients and providers, presidents typically use signing statements such as this one to flag provisions of laws they are enacting which they believe could impede on their executive authorities. By calling out the medical marijuana rider, Trump is making clear that his administration believes it can broadly enforce federal drug laws against people complying with state medical marijuana laws even though Congress told him not to.

But it doesn’t necessarily mean that a crackdown is on the way.

The administration hasn’t carried out any major enforcement activities against state-legal marijuana businesses since taking office, in accordance with Trump’s campaign pledges that he would respect the right of states to enact their own cannabis laws without federal interference. That also goes for recreational policies and businesses that aren’t even covered under the congressionally adopted rider, which has been part of federal law since 2014.

It is the third time Trump has said in a signing statement that his administration doesn’t necessarily have to abide by the medical marijuana provision. He included similar language when signing off on annual appropriations bills last year and in 2017, though he did not do so in 2018.

In August, the president reiterated his support for letting states legalize cannabis without federal interference.

“It’s a very big subject and right now we are allowing states to make that decision,” Trump said. “A lot of states are making that decision, but we’re allowing states to make that decision.”

Last year, when asked about separate pending congressional legislation that would more broadly exempt state-legal marijuana activity from the federal Controlled Substances Act, he said he “really” supports the bill.

Given the president’s consistently voiced support for respecting state cannabis laws, it’s not clear why he has gone out of his way to reserve his right to ignore the medical marijuana rider on a near-annual basis.

Among the handful of other provisions Trump singled out in his new signing statement are ones dealing with the closing the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, restrictions on diplomatic activities and the dissemination of information that may be protected by executive privilege.

The Fiscal Year 2020 funding bill that Trump signed into law on Friday does not contain a broader rider seeking to shield all state marijuana laws—including those that allow recreational use and sales—that had been approved by the House of Representatives earlier this year. It, along with another provision that would have protected banks that serve state-legal cannabis businesses from federal punishment, was dropped from the final legislation in bicameral negotiations with the Senate.

Congressional leaders did include several cannabis-related provisions in a report attached to the legislation, though, such as language directing the Food and Drug Administration to formulate a policy of enforcement discretion for CBD products and requiring the National Institute on Drug Abuse to compile a report on the barriers that the Schedule I status of drugs including marijuana places in front of scientific research.

CONTINUE READING…

RELATED:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/statement-by-the-president-33/?utm_source=link&utm_medium=header

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2014/01/02/on-legalization-when-the-u-n-comes-a-marching-along-we-will-all-be-singing-a-brand-new-song/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2014/10/15/lets-talk-about-corporate-cannabis/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/05/08/and-all-the-green-fields-will-runneth-red-with-blood/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/07/09/conflicting-federal-laws-beg-to-differ-on-marijuana-enforcement/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/10/26/rights-and-freedoms-may-in-no-case-be-exercised-contrary-to-purposes-and-principles-of-the-united-nations-how-the-united-nations-is-stealing-our-unalienable-rights-to-grow/

Statement by the President

Issued on: December 20, 2019

Today, I have signed into law H.R. 1158, the “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020” (the “Act”), which authorizes appropriations to fund the operation of certain agencies in the Federal Government through September 30, 2020.

Certain provisions of the Act (such as Division A, section 8070) purport to restrict the President’s constitutional authority as Commander in Chief to control the personnel and materiel that the President believes to be necessary or advisable for the successful conduct of military missions.  Others provisions (such as Division A, sections 8075, 8078, 8110, 9013, and 9016) purport to require advance notice to the Congress before the President may direct certain military actions or provide certain forms of military assistance.

In addition, Division C, section 534 and Division D, section 516 of the Act restricts transfers of detainees held at United States Naval Station Guantanamo Bay.  I fully intend to keep that detention facility open and to use it, as necessary or appropriate, for detention operations. Consistent with the statements I have issued in signing other bills, my Administration will treat these, and similar provisions, in a manner consistent with the President’s constitutional authority as Commander in Chief.  I also reiterate the longstanding understanding of the executive branch that requirements of advance notice regarding military or diplomatic actions encompass only actions for which providing advance notice is feasible and consistent with the President’s constitutional authority and duty as Commander in Chief to ensure national security.

Certain provisions of the Act (such as Division B, sections 509, 516, and 526; Division D, section 523) could, in certain circumstances, interfere with the exercise of the President’s constitutional authority to conduct diplomacy.  My Administration will treat each of these provisions consistent with the President’s constitutional authorities with respect to foreign relations, including the President’s role as the sole representative of the Nation in foreign affairs.

Division B, section 531 of the Act provides that the Department of Justice may not use any funds made available under this Act to prevent implementation of medical marijuana laws by various States and territories.  My Administration will treat this provision consistent with the President’s constitutional responsibility to faithfully execute the laws of the United States.

Certain provisions of the Act within Division D, title II, under the heading “Office of Management and Budget—Salaries and Expenses,” impose restrictions on supervision by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) of work performed by executive departments and agencies, including provisos that no funds made available to OMB “may be expended for the altering of the annual work plan developed by the Corps of Engineers for submission to the Committees on Appropriations”; that “none of the funds provided in this or prior Acts shall be used, directly or indirectly, by the Office of Management and Budget, for evaluating or determining if water resource project or study reports submitted by the Chief of Engineers acting through the Secretary of the Army are in compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and requirements relevant to the Civil Works water resource planning process”; and that “none of the funds appropriated in this Act for the Office of Management and Budget may be used for the purpose of reviewing any agricultural marketing orders or any activities or regulations under the provisions of the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937 (7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.).” The President has well-established authority to supervise and oversee the executive branch and to rely on subordinates, including aides within the Executive Office of the President, to assist in the exercise of that authority.  Legislation that significantly impedes the President’s ability to supervise the executive branch or obtain the assistance of aides in this function violates the separation of powers by undermining the President’s ability to fulfill his constitutional responsibilities, including the responsibility to faithfully execute the laws of the United States.  My Administration will, therefore, treat these restrictions consistent with these Presidential duties.

Certain provisions of the Act (such as Division C, sections 713 and 743) purport to prohibit the use of appropriations to supervise communications by employees of the executive branch to the Congress and to Inspectors General.  Other provisions (such as Division C, section 616) purport to prohibit the use of funds to deny an Inspector General access to agency records or documents.  My Administration will treat these provisions in a manner consistent with the President’s constitutional authority to control the disclosure of information that could impair foreign relations, national security, law enforcement, the deliberative processes of the executive branch, or the performance of the President’s constitutional duties, and to supervise communications by Federal officers and employees related to their official duties, including in cases where such communications would be unlawful or could reveal confidential information protected by executive privilege.

In addition, certain provisions of the Act (such as Division B, section 112) purport to mandate or regulate the dissemination of information that may be protected by executive privilege.  My Administration will treat these provisions consistent with the President’s constitutional authority to control information, the disclosure of which could impair national security, foreign relations, the deliberative processes of the executive branch, or the performance of the President’s constitutional duties.

Certain provisions of the Act (such as Division D, section 536) purport to require recommendations regarding legislation to the Congress. Because the Constitution gives the President the authority to recommend only “such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient,” my Administration will continue the practice of treating provisions like these as advisory and non‑binding.

Certain provisions of the Act (such as Division C, sections 101, 112, 113, 116, 117, 201, 541, 608, 609, 717, 730, 803(a), and 815) purport to condition the authority of officers to spend or reallocate funds on the approval of one or more congressional committees.  These are impermissible forms of congressional aggrandizement in the execution of the laws other than by the enactment of statutes.  My Administration will make appropriate efforts to notify the relevant committees before taking the specified actions and will accord the recommendations of such committees all appropriate and serious consideration, but it will not treat spending decisions as dependent on the approval or prior consultation with congressional committees.

DONALD J. TRUMP

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 20, 2019.

CONTINUE READING (SOURCE)

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to All!

USMjParty Christmas 2019

Praying for PEACE on EARTH,

Good Will to ALL,

That OUR Nation will HEAL,

Once and FOR ALL,

Let COMPASSION light your way,

Every single DAY,

LOVE ALL your Brothers and Sisters,

Because OUR FATHER intended it that way,

Do not forget those most FORGOTTEN,

On this day of remembrance,

Embrace one another,

AND

Pray for PEACE,

To OUR Heavenly Father,

Whose day of birth, which we celebrate,

By giving “presents” to each other?

It’s time that we, as his Children,

Give the gift to OUR Father….

PEACE to ALL

and

ALL for PEACE!

Much LOVE to ALL,

No matter your beliefs!

MERRY CHRISTMAS!

1937 Marihuana Tax Act – First Convictions — In A Nutshell

I received the following thru email from “Uncle Mike”… Thought it was well worth passing on….  No “cannabis” law is a good “cannabis” law!

caldwell

1937 Marihuana Tax Act – First Convictions — In A Nutshell

Uncle Mike 10/29/2019

Historically significant fact check list addressing common issues & problems with dates, people, places, charges and the chain of events surrounding America’s first federal marijuana convictions. This short 1-page report is based on the larger 190-page criminal case study book entitled:

U. S. District Court, Denver, Colorado Imposes First Federal Marihuana Law Penalties, Compilation of Publications, Interviews, Criminal Files and Photographs of Moses Baca & Samuel Caldwell, By Uncle Mike, Copyright Nov 12 2008, Feb 17 2010, May 5 2019.

The Marihuana Tax Act was approved August 2, 1937 and went into effect Friday, October 1st 1937.

Moses Baca, age 23, Mexican American born in Trinidad Colorado, was charged with violating the act on Monday the 4th.

Samuel R. Caldwell, age 57, white guy from Indiana, was charged with violating the act on Tuesday the 5th.

Federal grand jury indictments were issued on Thursday, October 7th, and both men were then brought before the court and sentenced on Friday, October 8th, 1937 after pleading guilty.

Leading the first federal court proceedings was Moses Baca, who received an 18-month sentence in Leavenworth Penitentiary for possessing ¼ ounce of marihuana. A search of his home was conducted at 2625 California Street, after a drunk & disturbance arrest, revealing one-fourth ounce of marijuana in his bureau drawer.

Following Baca’s possession case, Samuel R. Caldwell was sentenced. He received 4 years in the Leavenworth Penitentiary for selling 3 marihuana cigarettes to a man he met on the street named Claude Morgan and possessing 4 pounds of marihuana later found hidden in his Lothrop Hotel room at 1755 Lawrence. According to Caldwell’s friend, Alex Rahoutis, he had only been dealing a few months when he was busted by federal agents, and apparently didn’t smoke weed himself.

After their release:

Moses Baca, after his release on Dec 10, 1938, he returned to Denver, Colorado, but in 1940 he moved with his family to California. Moses ended up in Los Angeles General Hospital and died on March 19, 1948 of a ruptured pulmonary tuberculosis abscess that caused blood poisoning. The disease was most likely contracted in Denver as TB suffers commonly came to Colorado thinking the states dry air would help cure them.

Samuel Caldwell, after serving his sentence, was released on Nov. 5th, 1940. Approximately 8

months after his release Caldwell died in Denver, Colorado on June 24, 1941 of Primary Carcinoma of the Liver from excessive drinking.

United States of America National 5G Resolution


An Urgent Call for a Moratorium on 5th Generation Wireless  Technologies Pending Safety Testing

To:  Donald Trump, President of the United States of America 

December 11, 2019

We, the undersigned, are medical doctors, health professionals, scientists, engineers and public advocates who are deeply concerned about the potential health risks associated with 5G and the proliferation of electromagnetic radiation sources from wireless telecommunications technologies. 

The FCC has stated that 800,000 antenna sites will be required to fully deploy 5G in the United States. Global deployments are expected to reach almost 5 million by 2021. Industry projects 22 billion wirelessly connected devices worldwide as part of the Internet of Things. New wireless antennas are rapidly being attached to streetlights and utility poles directly in front of homes and schools. 5G will dramatically increase our daily exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in addition to the 2G, 3G, 4G, Wi-Fi, etc. RF-EMF from wireless infrastructure already in place that will continue to emit. The 5G antenna densification plan will lead to a significant increase of involuntary exposure to wireless radiation everywhere.

Cell phone and wireless were never premarket safety tested for long-term exposure to humans when they first came on the market decades ago. Now the harmful effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic exposure to humans and the environment are proven. In 2015, more than 250 scientists from more than 40 countries expressed their “serious concerns” in an EMF Appeal regarding the ubiquitous and increasing exposure to EMF generated by electric and wireless devices even before the additional 5G Internet of Things rollout. The scientists refer to the fact that “numerous recent scientific publications have shown that EMF affects living organisms at levels well below most international and national guidelines”. Since then, hundreds of doctors have signed onto new appeals specifically calling to halt 5G.

A large number of peer-reviewed scientific reports demonstrate harm to human health from EMFs. Effects include increased cancer risk, increased cellular stress, increased harmful free radicals, genetic damages, structural and functional changes of the reproductive system, learning and memory deficits, behavioral problems, neurological disorders, headaches, and negative impacts on general well-being in humans. Damage goes well beyond the human race, as there is growing evidence of harmful effects to trees, bees, plants, animals, and bacteria.

After the EMF scientists’ appeal was initiated in 2015, additional research has associated serious adverse biological effects of RF-EMF emissions from wireless technologies. The U.S. National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program (NTP) published its large-scale, $30 million animal study showing DNA damage and statistically significant increases in the incidence of brain cancer and heart cancer in animals exposed daily to wireless radiation. These findings support the results from human epidemiological studies finding associations between wireless radiation and brain tumor risk.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the cancer agency of the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2011 concluded that EMFs at frequencies 30 KHz to 300 GHz are possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B). However, since that date, new studies, including the NTP study mentioned above and several epidemiological and experimental investigations, have increased the evidence indicating that wireless is carcinogenic. Now in 2019, the IARC announced plans to re-evaluate RF-EMF for carcinogenicity as soon as 2022. 

As the U.S. Department of the Interior stated, “the electromagnetic radiation standards used by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) continue to be based on thermal heating, a criterion now nearly 30 years out of date and inapplicable today.” FCC guidelines only protect against heating effects (EPA 2002) and ignore the effects of pulse-modulated signals. Scientists have repeatedly found adverse biological effects that are caused without heating (”non-thermal effect”) at radiation levels far below the limits in FCC guidelines. Replicated research finds memory damage, behavioral problems and tumor promotion from “low” legally allowed levels of wireless.

As the EPA was defunded in the mid ‘90s, there are no federally developed safety limits and there is no health and safety agency in the United States with authority to review the research and ensure protections regarding the human health and environmental effects from wireless antennas. Internationally, the organizations that issue exposure standards have failed to develop sufficient guidelines. Published reviews and studies on the new higher frequencies to be used in 5G call for caution and warn of future impacts that will not only impact humans but also wildlife and especially bees.

We are concerned about the health and well-being of those who are most vulnerable: children, pregnant women, and persons sensitive to electromagnetic fields and who have chronic health problems.

We join with the thousands of doctors, scientists and health care providers worldwide who have recently issued appeals for urgent action on 5G to protect public health. The rapidly growing list includes the International EMF Scientist Appeal, Appeal to the European Union, Belgium Doctors Appeal, Canadian Doctors, Cyprus Medical Association, Physicians of Turin, Italy, the German Doctors Appeal, International Appeal to Stop 5G on Earth and Space and the International Society of Doctors for the Environment.

We call for a moratorium on 5G and any further wireless antenna densification until potential hazards for human health and the environment have been fully investigated by scientists independent from the wireless industry.  

Doctors or health practitioners who want to sign onto  this letter please email EHT at info@ehtrust.org

List of Signatories

Note: To sign please send your name, title and location to info@ehtrust.org

Signatories to the National 5G Resolution collected at the EMF Conference, September 2019

The resolution was attended the first U.S. medical conference fully dedicated to this topic, Electromagnetic Fields Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment”  convened in Scott’s Valley, California, from September 6-8, 2019.

As the conference was concluding, several participants agreed to initiate a National 5G Resolution, recommending a moratorium on the roll-out of fifth generation wireless, 5G, until potential hazards for human health and the environment have been fully investigated by scientists independent from the industry. 

Miguel Aguilera, MD, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Robin Anderson, PhD , Santa Rosa, California             

Wayne Anderson, ND,  Santa Rosa, California

Randy Baker, MD, Soquel, California

Stephanie Belseth, NP, Edina, Minnesota

Matthew Bernstein, MD, Chicago, Illinois

Andrea Berrin, MA, Aptos, California

Tara Boyd, ND, Seattle, Washington    

Robert Brown, MD Export, Pennsylvania

Sarah Carnes, ND Woodinville, Washington

Margaret Christensen, MD  Dallas, Texas

Rowena Chua, MD,  Glenview, Illinois

Tracey Cook, ND,  Orrville, Ohio                                                                                             

Deborah L. Dykema, DO,  Phoenix, Arizona

Eric Gordon, MD,   San Rafael, California                                                                                                                            

Cheryl Grey, MD, Boulder, Colorado

Devra Davis PhD, MPH, Jackson Hole Wyoming

Trudy Heil, NP, Portland, Oregon

Anne Hill, ND, Portland, Oregon

Lynn Hinkle, PA, ND,   Mill Valley, California

Tori Jelter, MD, Walnut Creek, California

Elizabeth Kelley, MA, Tucson, Arizona

Jennifer Kessman MD, IFMEP, ABFM,FAAFP, Dallas, Texas                                       

Kim Lear, MA,  Lyons, Colorado,

Kaiser Permanente, Northern California, 

Ronald Lynch, MD, Orlando, Florida                    

Karl Maret, MD, MA, Corralitos, California

Dorota Matusewicz, MD,  Clearwater, Florida

Kelly McCann, MD, Costa Mesa, California                                                                                                                            

Lisa Nagy, MD, Martha’s Vineyard, MA

Bonnie Nedrow, ND,  President, National Association of Environmental Medicine

Kalpana D. Patel, MD, Buffalo, New York

  Victoria Nee, MD, Chicago, Illinois                     

Daniel Rieders, MD, Palo Alto, California 

Stephanie Riley, ND, Truckee, California  

Sandra Ross, PhD., Mill Valley, California

Marly Sachsman, ND, Ellsworth, Maine      

Natalie Sadler, MD, Black Mountain, North Carolina                                                   

Glayol Sahba, MD,  Sacrament, California                                                                                                                            

Christine Salter, MD, St. Louis, Missouri

Lindsay Samuelson, ND, Toledo, Ohio                     

Lisa Saslove, MS, RD, Sebastopol, California 

Elizabeth H. Sims-Day, ND, Lake Forest Park, Washington 

Therese Stokan, DO, Port Angeles, Washington                                                                                                                

Irina Strelyuk, ND, San Rafael, California                       

Wallace Taylor, MD, Austin, Texas                                                                                                                                 

Veronica Tilden, DO, Nevada City, California   

Diana Vandegriff, NMD, Tempe, Arizona                                                                                                                                                    

Elizabeth Vaughn, MD, High Point, North

Carolina Kathy Veon, DOM, AP, CCN, Orlando, Florida                    

Kevin Wand, DO,  Bloomington,Minnesota                                                                                                                          

Melody Wong, ND, Burlingame, California

Mina Yoon, ND, LAC, San Francisco, California

Sarah Aminoff, Union City, California         

Laura Bobzien, Dallas, Texas           

August Brice, Founder, Tech Wellness California

Susan Busen, Palos Heights, Illinois

Nancy Costa, Heartfelt Spaces, San Rafael, California    

Teresa Demarie, MBA, Long Beach, California      

Jennifer Crumpton,  Austin, Texas         

Shilpa Dashpute, MA,  Glendora, California  

Cecelia Doucette, MTPW, Ashland, Massachusetts      

Michael Garabedian, Attorney, Lincoln, California             

David Getoff, CNN, CTN, FAAIM   Vice President, Price Pottenger Nutrition Foundation                

William Holland,  Topanga, California                

Mieke Jacobs,  Lake Zurich, Illinois       

Monika Karajewski, Santa Barbara, California

Miriam Lindbeck,    Santa Barbara, California 

Rola Masri,  Los Angeles, California

Cheryl Matthews, Los Altos Hills, California      

Lloyd Morgan, EE,  Berkeley, California       

Kevin Mottus. LCSW,  Los Angeles, California   

Reilley Mullin, FNP, Trinidad, California                

Ajna Orion,  Felton, California                                                                                                                             

Cynthia Quattro, PA, LAc, Soquel, California      

Theresa Ricker,  San Antonio, Texas     

Theodora Scarato MSW, Environmental Health Trust

Stephen Scott,  Novato, California    

Taryn Slauson,   Santa Fe, New Mexico                                          

Leslie Stalder, LC,  Arcata, California               

Amber Stokes, Med,  Santa Monica, California  

Sam Wieder, MBA,  Greenville, Pennsylvania

Eric Windheim, BBEC, EMRS, Sacramento, California

Nasha Winters, ND, LAc, FABND,  Durango, Colorado                 

Glenn Kikel, ACN, Lyons, Colorado        

Mary Anne Tierney, RN, MPH,   Ashville, North Carolina

SOURCE L INK….

Agencies clarify requirements for providing financial services to hemp-related businesses

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From Board of Governors Federal Reserve System

Agencies clarify requirements for providing financial services to hemp-related businesses

December 3, 2019 

WASHINGTON-Four federal agencies in conjunction with the state bank regulators today issued a statement clarifying the legal status of hemp growth and production and the relevant requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) for banks providing services to hemp-related businesses.

The statement emphasizes that banks are no longer required to file suspicious activity reports (SAR) for customers solely because they are engaged in the growth or cultivation of hemp in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. For hemp-related customers, banks are expected to follow standard SAR procedures, and file a SAR if indicia of suspicious activity warrants.

This statement provides banks with background information on the legal status of hemp, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) interim final rule on the production of hemp, and the BSA considerations when providing banking services to hemp-related businesses.

This statement also indicates that the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) will issue additional guidance after further reviewing and evaluating the USDA interim final rule.

The statement was issued by the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, FinCEN, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Conference of State Bank Supervisors. Banks can contact the USDA, state departments of agriculture, and tribal governments with further questions regarding the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (2018 Farm Bill) and its implementing regulations.

Joint Guidance on Providing Financial Services to Customers Engaged in Hemp-Related Businesses (PDF)

For Federal Reserve Board media inquiries please contact Darren Gersh at 202-452-2955.

Source Link

House Judiciary Passes MORE Act to Decriminalize Marijuana at Federal Level

legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300

Nov 20, 2019

Washington, D.C. –Today, the House Judiciary Committee passed H.R. 3884, the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, by a vote of 24-10. The MORE Act is one of the most comprehensive marijuana reforms bills ever introduced in the U.S. Congress. The MORE Act aims to correct the historical injustices of failed drug policies that have disproportionately impacted communities of color and low-income communities by decriminalizing marijuana at the federal level, reassessing marijuana convictions, and investing in local communities. U.S. Senator Kamala Harris introduced the companion bill in the Senate.

Yesterday, Chairman Nadler and other Members of Congress held a press conference to highlight the legislation. Watch here.

“I have long believed that the criminalization of marijuana has been a mistake, and the racially disparate enforcement of marijuana laws has only compounded this mistake,” said Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY). “While states have led the way in reform, our federal laws have not kept pace with the obvious need for change. With the passage of the MORE Act today, the Judiciary Committee has taken long overdue steps to address the devastating injustices caused by the War on Drugs and to finally decriminalize marijuana at the federal level.”
“As more states legalize marijuana, millions of Americans with marijuana-related convictions continue to face overwhelming barriers to jobs, education, and housing,” said Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA). “That is why we must act to remove the burden of marijuana convictions and make sure these individuals have the support needed to move forward. It is also critical that everyone — especially people of color who have been disproportionately impacted by the War on Drugs — has a real opportunity to participate in this growing industry. This is a matter of racial and economic justice. I am grateful for Chairman Nadler’s partnership on this issue and for his leadership in moving this legislation forward. I look forward to the House of Representatives passing our legislation soon.”

“This is an incredible step forward in righting the wrongs of the failed and racist War on Drugs. The federal government has lagged behind as states continue to modernize how we regulate and decriminalize cannabis. As Co-Chair of the bipartisan Cannabis Caucus, I’ll keep pushing to ensure Congress makes our cannabis policies are fair, equitable, and inclusive,” said Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-CA). “I applaud Chairman Nadler for his leadership, and look forward to seeing the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment & Expungement (MORE) Act get a vote on the House floor.”

“This will be one of the most historic events in our movement,” said Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR). “The MORE Act is the most comprehensive cannabis legislation to date. I am proud to have worked with Chairman Nadler to develop this bill and applaud his leadership to bring it in front of the committee. This is a major step forward. We are making outstanding progress in our blueprint to end the federal prohibition of cannabis and address the injustice brought on by the war on drugs.”

“With today’s mark-up of the MORE Act, the United States is coming one step closer to ending the devastating harms of marijuana prohibition, which have fallen so heavily on Black and Brown people,” said Maria McFarland Sanchez-Moreno, Executive Director of the Drug Policy Alliance. “This legislation won’t make up for the full scale of harm that prohibition has caused to its victims. It’s not going to return anyone their lost dreams, time lost at the mercy of the criminal justice system; or the years spent away from their families. But this legislation is the closest we’ve come yet to not only ending those harms at the federal level, but also beginning to repair them. Now it’s up to Congress to do the right thing and swiftly pass the bill to ensure justice is not delayed a moment longer.”
“We’re thrilled that House Judiciary made history today by voting the MORE Act out of Committee,” said Ed Chung, Vice President for Criminal Justice Reform at American Progress. “This represents a significant victory for marijuana reform and for communities of color that have borne the brunt of this country’s punitive drug enforcement policies. The House must build on today’s momentum and swiftly move the MORE Act to the floor for a vote from the full body. Congress has an extraordinary opportunity to ensure equity leads today’s marijuana reform policy.”

“The House Judiciary Committee’s consideration of the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act is a significant step towards ending the failed war on drugs and correcting some of the harms that it has caused,” said Charlotte Resing, Policy Analyst, ACLU. “The bill not only deschedules marijuana at the federal level, but it also provides a roadmap for states to legalize in a just and equitable manner. The MORE Act also provides resentencing and expungement for those with marijuana convictions and mandates the inclusion of those most impacted by the criminalization of marijuana in the newly legal marijuana industry. The ACLU is pleased to support the MORE Act and its efforts to counter the over-criminalization, over policing, and mass incarceration stemming from the war on drugs.”

“The passage of the MORE Act represents the first time that the Judiciary Committee has ever had a successful vote to end the cruel policy of marijuana criminalization,” said NORML Political Director Justin Strekal. “Not only does the bill reverse the failed prohibition of cannabis, but it provides pathways for opportunity and ownership in the emerging industry for those who have suffered most. In 2018 alone, over 663,000 Americans were arrested for marijuana related crimes, a three-year high. Now that Chairman Nadler has moved the MORE Act through committee, it is time for the full House to vote and have every member of Congress show their constituents which side of history they stand on.”

The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act:

  • Decriminalizes marijuana at the federal level by removing the substance from the Controlled Substances Act. This applies retroactively to prior and pending convictions, and enables states to set their own policy.
  • Requires federal courts to expunge prior convictions, allows prior offenders to request expungement, and requires courts, on motion, to conduct re-sentencing hearings for those still under supervision.
  • Authorizes the assessment of a 5% sales tax on marijuana and marijuana products to create an Opportunity Trust Fund, which includes three grant programs:
    • The Community Reinvestment Grant Program: Provides services to the individuals most adversely impacted by the War on Drugs, including job training, re-entry services, legal aid, literacy programs, youth recreation, mentoring, and substance use treatment. 
    • The Cannabis Opportunity Grant Program: Provides funds for loans to assist small businesses in the marijuana industry that are owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals.
    • The Equitable Licensing Grant Program: Provides funds for programs that minimize barriers to marijuana licensing and employment for the individuals most adversely impacted by the War on Drugs.
  • Opens up Small Business Administration funding for legitimate cannabis-related businesses and service providers.
  • Provides non-discrimination protections for marijuana use or possession, and for prior convictions for a marijuana offense:
    • Prohibits the denial of any federal public benefit (including housing) based on the use or possession of marijuana, or prior conviction for a marijuana offense.
    • Provides that the use or possession of marijuana, or prior conviction for a marijuana offense, will have no adverse impact under the immigration laws.
  • Requires the Bureau of Labor Statistics to collect data on the demographics of the industry to ensure people of color and those who are economically disadvantaged are participating in the industry.

###

SOURCE

S. 2227: MORE Act of 2019

LINK TO DOWNLOAD PDF

dpa: “ In an unprecedented move, the House Judiciary Committee will vote on the MORE Act this Wednesday.”

more act

Above:  Link to Press Conference

IMMEDIATE ACTION REQUEST!!!

From Drug Policy Alliance,

I want to make sure you didn’t miss the huge news in my email below. Tomorrow will go down in history as the closest we’ve come to ending federal marijuana prohibition and repairing the harms it’s causing to our communities.

The House Judiciary Committee will vote on the MORE Actthe first time ever a marijuana legalization bill has advanced this far federally. Please take action to help us make history and move the MORE Act onto the House floor.

PLEASE SEND A MESSAGE TO YOUR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS!

DPA and supporters like you have spearheaded this groundbreaking bill from the beginning. This morning, our Executive Director Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno spoke with sponsors Rep. Jerry Nadler and Rep. Barbara Lee at a press conference about this pivotal moment.

Marijuana prohibition is harming us all, falling especially heavily on Black and Brown people. But together, we’re moving the MORE Act forward to end the federal war on marijuana and right the wrongs of prohibition.

Tune in with me and watch this crucial vote here. I’ll be in touch tomorrow and am hopeful we’ll make history!

SOURCE: 

Drug Policy Alliance
131 West 33rd St., 15th Floor New York, NY 10001

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/BILLS-116s2227is/pdf/BILLS-116s2227is.pdf

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/116/s2227/text

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http://www.drugpolicy.org/

"…There is NO SUCH THING as a "Good" Pot Law, and that INCLUDES so called "Legalization"…."

daffy duck

11/19/2019

6 States Trying to Legalize Recreational Marijuana in 2020

The opinion given here, is a response in comment to the article linked above, and the explanation thereof, are directed to inform everyone of just what “legalization” does…It lies to you!  Total REPEAL of these unlawful Statutes much be ensued to regain our Freedom upon this planet.  It’s not just Cannabis that they are afterIt is total control of everything…They just started with the “Marijuana”!

smkrider

Chris Ryan

I am totally convinced that the “National Organization for the Retention of Marijuana Legislation” (NORML) has been directed and driven by DEA COINTELPRO Money all along. It is the clearest explanation for why they keep insisting on keeping pot laws alive by demanding “regulations”.

Also, most of the corporate pro regulation types are also heavily invested in alcohol or tobacco or big pharma. As a result they try to somehow equate alcohol and tobacco with pot. But this is flawed because pot never killed anyone but alcohol and tobacco have both killed a lot of people.

“…There is NO SUCH THING as a “Good” Pot Law, and that INCLUDES so called “Legalization”….”

Just wait for a couple of years after you have passed your new pot laws, and the statehouse has had a chance to alter and amend and water down your law, and THEN we will see if you still like all the unseen and unpredictable changes that you did not predict or calculate. Then we will see if you STILL think it is a good idea or if you will realize, (As I did ages ago) that there is NO SUCH THING as a “Good” Pot Law, and that you wasted your time with all those signatures and all that lobbying and advertising.

There are many good ideas out there, and almost all of them are overshadowed by other bad ideas. Things like the idea that pot should be treated like alcohol for example. (In over 20,000 years if known human usage of cannabis there has yet to be a single case of toxic overdose from cannabis. Yet people drink themselves to death routinely. On that basis alone it is clear that pot should NOT be regulated “Like Alcohol”.) I tell you, putting your time money and effort into writing a law to make cannabis use “Legal” is NOT as useful and productive as simply removing the law itself so that there are no prohibitions. Abolish the pot law instead of re-write it.

I think that what you are proposing is just a form of legalized dealing for the rich that unfairly excludes the little guy and seeks to use the law to create a lever against smallholders and persons of color while granting enormous special privileges for the wealthy. Every state I have seen that tries to “Legalize” pot does so by starting with a “Licensing” deal where the entry fee for a license is about a million dollars. And in every one of those states the state bends over backwards to grant concessions to corporations seeking to sell and market pot while using tax money from those corporations to crack down on anybody who does NOT have a license. It is like “Legalization for the wealthy”.

And in SOME states, (Like Colorado for example.) the money brought in by cannabis taxes is used to double down on busting persons of color who are deemed “Illegal”. I say that all this is just playing with numbers and rules and that it is just more bullshit. A sort of “kinder gentler” form of keeping pot basically illegal while granting a special privilege to those with money. And I honestly DO NOT REALLY CARE about the guy who gets busted with a “Small Amount” because I already know that small amount came from someone who has a large amount.

After spending my entire life as an adult in the “Pot Underground”, and being the biggest pot dealer in Ohio before I got busted, I am honestly prejudiced in favor of the small to middling sized pot dealer who is the vital middle link in the pot supply chain. Legalization as it affects that guy is going to really determine what ultimately happens to pot in this country.

If you build a legalization that cuts that guy out, or gives their role to someone who do not have the same knowledge and experience that the mid-level dealers provide, you will end up with a market that is designed to cater to the wealthy the privileged and the few. As a direct result, I will tell you that merely working to “re-write” the pot laws as opposed to abolishing and eliminating them, will hurt your end result. ABOLISH ALL POT LAWS NOW.

I have BEEN the fucking “Black Market” for longer than you have been alive. You can take your studies at Oaksterdam and stick them up your ass. Your proposals do NOT create a level playing field, and they amount to legalization for the rich, which is a far cry from everybody can do what they want. When you rail against the black market you are saying that you are just wanting to have the money and lifestyle of a pot dealer without the responsibility or the risk. But at the same time you fail to recognize that the stash in your pocket is there BECAUSE of that very same black market you claim to despise.

I say to you that the black market is the ONLY market, and that unless you recognize how the entire pot distribution network actually works you are just pissing in the wind and creating legalization for the rich.

 I speak from experience. I have spent my entire life in the Pot Underground, including about 10 years where I was simply put, the biggest pot dealer in Ohio. (That all ended when I got busted in ’09.) Nowadays I spend a lot of my time using my experience to talk about the real day to day realities of those in the Pot Underground and they ways that so called “Legalization” will actually HURT pot distribution schemes unless you are in the top 1%. You have not had the time, or been in the position to have had the sorts of experiences I have had, nor to gain the knowledge that I have achieved, and are just spouting off without knowing what you are talking about. You speculate endlessly about how things SHOULD be but you don’t really have the time or experience to really know. And I will close with this simple adage. “…There is NO SUCH THING as a “Good” Pot Law, and that INCLUDES your so called “Legalization”…” ABOLISH ALL POT LAWS NOW!

All you are doing is trying to corporatize pot. And the only way that can happen is by using laws and regulations to do so. And all of those government laws and regulations are completely unnecessary.

Between the American Civil War and the Great Depression there was NO FEDERAL POT LAW WHATSOEVER. And there was no national crisis regarding or involving pot at that time either. So the claim that pot laws are needed and necessary are provably false.


https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/10/26/rights-and-freedoms-may-in-no-case-be-exercised-contrary-to-purposes-and-principles-of-the-united-nations-how-the-united-nations-is-stealing-our-unalienable-rights-to-grow/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PrY7nFbwAY&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR3C5OMnPZC9KuN1ukjtrIrefgu8GJ0gY4bD6BBv1MvR5h6l2WFOpg92I8s

https://www.facebook.com/chris.ryan.1232760

https://www.facebook.com/groups/USMjParty/permalink/10158252526518521/

This Is The Way It Works…

11/19/2019  By:  Cris Ericson

cris ericson 10.3.18

Let’s say for example, you win the lottery and spend a lot of money making television ads to promote your campaign as a candidate for the November 3, 2020 Election for U.S. Congress, and you don’t say much, just the usual “Hope” and “Change” and words that people fall for, and because you are dressed nicely and speak softly with a very slight sex appeal, you get elected.

Maybe you hire a professional voice dub-over, a person to speak in the commercials, and people think its your voice, but its not (did you notice Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez had the sexiest softest voice in the world in her radio commercials, and then she won the election and in real life she sounds like a hag with a sore throat?).

Well, O.K., so let’s imagine you win. Now what?

You go to Washington, D.C. and you are going to make marijuana LAWFUL and you are going to repeal every single stinking no good for nothing marijuana law. You are going to propose an Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, like ending alcoholic beverage prohibition, back when alcoholic beverages were actually illegal in the United States.

But then something terrible happens!

Speaker of the House, Nanny Pelosi, informs you that SHE is the Speaker of the House and SHE will assign YOU to whichever Committee SHE wants to assign you to.

Huh?

Where is the freedom of association guaranteed by the US Constitution? Why can’t you join any committee you want to join – like agriculture! Yeah, that’s the ticket – the Agriculture Committee! Make all plants legal!

Oh, but no, no, no, no, no, no! Speaker of the House, Nanny Pelosi will screech and scream at YOU if you DARE expect to join any committee you want to!

Then, guess what?

You might think you can go visit any committee hearing room you want to, but this is not so!  You would be kicked out on your ass!  The uppity close friends of Nanny Pelosi like to have THEIR hearing rooms in secret!

Why?

Why don’t you get any freedom of speech and freedom of association so you can do what you need to do to make marijuana LAWFUL?

Ah ha!

FOR EXAMPLE, if you are on a medical type committee, then the in-crowd in that committee room writes up a Bill to give the N.I.H., National Institute of Health, billions of tax dollars which the N.I.H. gives to researchers who patent their inventions of pharmaceutical drugs, and then they start their own new pharmaceutical corporations and then they give the members of the Congressional Committee “kick-backs” of political campaign contributions and their Lobbyists wine and dine them and give them very special favors.

Huh?

Isn’t that some kind of combination of bribery and money laundering and witch craft? Yeah, but no one complains because the committee hearings are in secret, and you can’t get in because Speaker of the House Nanny Pelosi has the lock and key to every room.

And so it goes, the U.S. Congress is the number one crime gang in the entire world. Guns, pharmaceutical drugs, weapons, bombs for sale to our “allies”! 

Yep, everything is all for sale with a nice kick-back to the very specially selected members of US Congress, who Nanny Pelosi picks to be in certain committee rooms, and then she gets HER kick-back, you better believe it! And YOU get assigned, by Nanny Pelosi, to the toilet paper committee!

So, WHAT DO WE DO ABOUT THIS? HOW DO WE CHANGE THE BULLSHIT GOING ON IN WASHINGTON, D.C. SO WE CAN MAKE MARIJUANA TRULY LAWFUL?  AND, restore our God-given Human Rights as well?

We must promote the alarming and shocking new idea that members of the US Congress should have equal rights.  The same as each other.  If they don’t have equal rights the same as each other, then the people in the States that they represent do NOT have equal representation! We must DEMAND that all of our elected US Senators and US Congressmen and US Congresswomen and US Congress, LGBT and US Congress-sexless people have EQUAL RIGHTS TO FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION TO JOIN ANY COMMITTEE THEY WANT TO JOIN, AND TO ENTER ANY HEARING ROOM THEY WANT TO ENTER, AND FREEDOM OF SPEECH TO HAVE AN EQUAL TURN TO TALK ABOUT A SUBJECT.

THAT’S THE BOTTOM LINE.

The shocking story behind Richard Nixon’s ‘War on Drugs’ that targeted blacks and anti-war activists

Scholar @Mark_J_Perry   June 14, 2018

This Sunday, June 17 will mark the 47th anniversary of a shameful day in US history — it’s when President Richard Nixon’s declared what has been the US government’s longest and costliest war — the epic failure known as the War on Drugs. At a press conference on that day in 1971, Nixon identified drug abuse as “public enemy number one in the United States” and launched a failed, costly and inhumane federal war on Americans that continues to today. Early the following year, Nixon created the Office of Drug Abuse Law Enforcement (ODALE) in January 1972 to wage a government war on otherwise peaceful and innocent Americans who voluntarily chose to ingest plants, weeds, and intoxicants proscribed by the government. In July 1973, ODALE was consolidated, along with several other federal drug agencies, into the newly established Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as a new “super agency” to handle all aspects of the War on Drugs Otherwise Peaceful Americans.

But as John Ehrlichman, Nixon’s counsel and Assistant for Domestic Affairs, revealed in 1994, the real public enemy in 1971 wasn’t really drugs or drug abuse. Rather the real enemies of the Nixon administration were the anti-war left and blacks, and the War on Drugs was designed as an evil, deceptive and sinister policy to wage a war on those two groups. In an article in the April 2016 issue of The Atlantic (“Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs“) author and reporter Dan Baum explains how “John Ehrlichman, the Watergate co-conspirator, unlocked for me one of the great mysteries of modern American history: How did the United States entangle itself in a policy of drug prohibition that has yielded so much misery and so few good results?” As Baum discovered, here’s the dirty and disgusting secret to that great mystery of what must be the most expensive, shameful, and reprehensible failed government policy in US history.

Americans have been criminalizing psychoactive substances since San Francisco’s anti-opium law of 1875, but it was Ehrlichman’s boss, Richard Nixon, who declared the first “War on Drugs” in 1971 and set the country on the wildly punitive and counterproductive path it still pursues. I’d tracked Ehrlichman, who had been Nixon’s domestic-policy adviser, to an engineering firm in Atlanta, where he was working on minority recruitment. At the time, I was writing a book about the politics of drug prohibition. I started to ask Ehrlichman a series of earnest, wonky questions that he impatiently waved away.

“You want to know what this was really all about?” he asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or blacks, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

Nixon’s invention of the War on Drugs as a political tool was cynical, but every president since — Democrat and Republican alike — has found it equally useful for one reason or another. Meanwhile, the growing cost of the Drug War is now impossible to ignore: billions of dollars wasted, bloodshed in Latin America and on the streets of our own cities, and millions of lives destroyed by draconian punishment that doesn’t end at the prison gate; one of every eight black men has been disenfranchised because of a felony conviction.

MP: As much as Prohibition (The War on Alcohol) was also an expensive, epic and misguided failure of government policy, it didn’t have its origins in any type of equivalent sinister and evil plot like the War on Drugs to destroy enemies of the Woodrow Wilson administration in 1919. In fact, President Wilson vetoed the Volstead Act, the popular name for the National Prohibition Act, but the House and Senate both voted quickly to override the veto and America started the War on Alchohol Otherwise Peaceful Americans Who Voluntarily Chose to Ingest Beer, Wine, and Spirits in 1920.

If the real goal of the War on Drugs was to target, convict and incarcerate subversive anti-war “hippies” and black Americans, as Ehrlichman describes it, it sure worked as the chart above of the male incarceration rate in the US shows. During the nearly 50-year period between 1925 and the early 1970s, the male incarceration rate was remarkably stable at about 200 men per 100,000 population, or 1 US male per 500, according to data from Bureau of Justice Statistics. By 1986, about a decade after the War on Drugs started locking up drug users and dealers in cages, the male incarceration rate doubled to 400 per 100,000 population. Then within another decade, the male incarceration rate doubled again to more than 800 by 1996 before reaching a historic peak of 956 in 2008 (about one in 100) that was almost five times higher than the stable rate before the War on Drugs. The arrest and incarceration data show that the War on Drugs had a significantly much greater negative effect on blacks and Hispanics than whites, making the Drug War even more shameful for its devastating and disproportionate adverse effects on America’s most vulnerable and disadvantaged populations.

Since the 2008 peak, the male incarceration rate has been gradually declining in each of the last seven years of available data through 2016, possibly because of three trends: a) decriminalization of weeds at the city and state level, b) the legalization of medical weeds at the state level, and c) now legalization of recreational weeds at the city and state levels.

While there could have been other factors that contributed to the nearly five-fold increase in the male incarceration rate between the early 1970s and the peak in 2008, research clearly shows that the War on Drugs, along with mandatory minimum sentencing in the 1980s and the disparate treatment of powdered cocaine and “crack cocaine” (powdered cocaine processed with baking soda into smokable rocks) were all significant contributing factors to the unprecedented rate of incarcerating Americans. Here are some conclusions from the 2014 book The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences (my emphasis):

  1. The states’ combined incarceration rates increased across all crime categories between 1980 and 2010 (see chart above). Most striking, however, is the dramatic increase in the incarceration rate for drug-related crimes. In 1980, imprisonment for drug offenses was rare, with a combined state incarceration rate of 15 per 100,000 population. By 2010, the drug incarceration rate had increased nearly 10-fold to 143 per 100,000. Indeed, the rate of incarceration for the single category of drug-related offenses, excluding local jails and federal prisons, by itself exceeds by 50% the average incarceration rate for all crimes of Western European countries and is twice the average incarceration rate for all crimes of a significant number of European countries.
  2. Arrest rates for federal drug offenses climbed in the 1970s, and mandatory prison time for these offenses became more common in the 1980s. Mandatory prison sentences, intensified enforcement of drug laws, and long sentences contributed not only to overall high rates of incarceration but also especially to extraordinary rates of incarceration in black and Latino communities. Intensified enforcement of drug laws subjected blacks, more than whites, to new mandatory minimum sentences—despite lower levels of drug use and no higher demonstrated levels of trafficking among the black than the white population.
  3. As a result of the lengthening of sentences and greatly expanded drug law enforcement and imprisonment for drug offenses, criminal defendants became more likely to be sentenced to prison and remained there significantly longer than in the past. The policy shifts that propelled the growth in incarceration had disproportionately large effects on African Americans and Latinos. Indeed, serving time in prison has become a normal life event among recent birth cohorts of African American men who have not completed high school.

Bottom Line: Even without the nefarious, vile, and veiled origins revealed by Ehrlichman in 1994, the War on Drugs Otherwise Peaceful Americans Who Voluntarily Choose To Ingest or Sell Intoxicants Currently Proscribed by the Government, Which Will Lock Up Users or Sellers in Cages if Caught would represent one of the most shameful chapters in America’s history. But with its intention to destroy the black community and anti-war peace activists, which has certainly been “successfully” achieved for the black community, the shamefulness of the War on Drugs is elevated to a much higher level of despicable, evil immorality.

Mark J. Perry

Mark J. Perry

Scholar

CONTINUE READING…

Arrangements Being Made for TKP Thorne Peters

tkp cemetery

Arrangements for burial are in the process of being made at Elmwood Cemetery located at;

824 S. Dudley Street
Memphis, Tennessee 38104

LINK above…

So far, costs are at approximately $ 5,795.00, which includes;

$ 2,995.00 Cemetery Costs; $ 1,200.00 Open/Close, $ 1,500.00 Preparation Fees. 

DONATIONS are desperately needed!  You can donate thru the link above by contacting the Cemetery, or thru the “Freedom Fund” on ThornePeters.com.

Further information will be made available as it is planned.

Please help our “Freedom Fighter” to be laid to rest in a most appropriate place!

Additionally, Ms. Linda Harrah will need help with legal fee’s, etc.,

Any small amount is most appreciated!

Thank You!

tkp 1

https://www.facebook.com/thorne.peters/videos/2583959581684371/UzpfSTEwMDAwMDA1MjI4MDUxNDpWSzo3Njc0NzE0MzcwMTI0OTc/

http://www.elmwoodcemetery.org/

https://www.facebook.com/thorne.peters/videos/2585574071522922/?__tn__=%2CdlC-R&eid=ARCZFIvKjmvA8BboKF6oPqNNENXHVuPqGJHNVj6X__6xYIwmuFdBO7N-9v45asuelZ376UniyUfgr0RE&hc_ref=ARTfvDLn31JUqYbrBEsjzP9gddGabcIAB90-upzvriC7RCUyk5SXycn4S0ISwBYol1Q

Arrangements Being Made for TKP Thorne Peters

tkp cemetery

Arrangements for burial are in the process of being made at Elmwood Cemetery located at;

824 S. Dudley Street
Memphis, Tennessee 38104

LINK above…

So far, costs are at approximately $ 5,795.00, which includes;

$ 2,995.00 Cemetery Costs; $ 1,200.00 Open/Close, $ 1,500.00 Preparation Fees. 

DONATIONS are desperately needed!  You can donate thru the link above by contacting the Cemetery, or thru the “Freedom Fund” on ThornePeters.com.

Further information will be made available as it is planned.

Please help our “Freedom Fighter” to be laid to rest in a most appropriate place!

Additionally, Ms. Linda Harrah will need help with legal fee’s, etc.,

Any small amount is most appreciated!

Thank You!

tkp 1

https://www.facebook.com/thorne.peters/videos/2583959581684371/UzpfSTEwMDAwMDA1MjI4MDUxNDpWSzo3Njc0NzE0MzcwMTI0OTc/

http://www.elmwoodcemetery.org/

https://www.facebook.com/thorne.peters/videos/2585574071522922/?__tn__=%2CdlC-R&eid=ARCZFIvKjmvA8BboKF6oPqNNENXHVuPqGJHNVj6X__6xYIwmuFdBO7N-9v45asuelZ376UniyUfgr0RE&hc_ref=ARTfvDLn31JUqYbrBEsjzP9gddGabcIAB90-upzvriC7RCUyk5SXycn4S0ISwBYol1Q

BLAKE ASHBY; 2020 LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE

Blake

Video LINK above!

American Capitalism is BROKEN and we need to fix it!

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American Capitalism is broken, and we need to fix it. What made our economy great, our country great, was a compromise many decades ago – Democratic Capitalism. A key part of that compromise was an agreement that we would all play by the same set of financial rules. One set of rules.

And it worked. Because we all played by the same set of rules, everyone had a chance to participate in our economy, and everybody had a chance to benefit from our economy. Until the 1980s’ the wealth our economy created was shared by everyone, wealthy, middle class and even the poor. Every income level got to participate in the benefits of capitalism. It was a rising tide that lifted all boats.

Since the 1980s’ the exact opposite has been true. Virtually all of the financial gains generated by our economy over the last 30 years, more than 21 trillion dollars in wealth, has gone almost exclusively to the very top, to the very wealthy. In the last three decades, the middle class and the poor have received only a tiny, tiny sliver the wealth created by our economy during that time.

This was NOT the natural result of capitalism. It happened because the Keepers of Capitalism allowed a second set of rules to be slipped into different parts of our economy that only benefitted a small part of our population. A second set of rules that allowed Corporate CEO salaries to go from 20 times workers wages to 300 times workers wages. A second set of rules that allows private equity funds to buy, strip and bankrupt healthy companies. A second set of rules that allow Wall Street to generate tens of billions of dollars in profits from selling and insuring things it doesn’t even own. A second set of rules that allows the very wealthy to avoid almost any scrutiny from the IRS.

We can fix all of these. We can fix the distortion that allowed CEO salaries to skyrocket. We can end the advantages of private equity. We can keep Wall Street from selling things it doesn’t own. We can make the IRS treat every taxpayer exactly the same. We can do it. We can get back to one set of rules for everybody. We can get back to an economy where EVERYBODY shares in the gains.

And we should do it, because capitalism actually works better if there is one set of rules for everybody.

Fixing American capitalism won’t be easy, because the people that are making all of the money don’t want the system to change. But we can do it. If we all work together, we can get back to one set of financial rules for everybody. We can get back to an economy where every American benefits. We can get back to Democratic Capitalism.

BLAKE ASHBY 2020 LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE

https://www.facebook.com/Ashby2020/

https://www.facebook.com/Ashby2020/videos/501144617410405/

https://www.lp.org/

DEA Data Show Kentucky Has Highest Rate of Illicit Marijuana Plants in US

Monday, Nov. 11, 2019 | Author: ProCon.org

Kentucky, where both recreational and medical marijuana are illegal, grows more illicit marijuana plants per 100,000 people than any other state, according to DEA data analyzed by American Addiction Centers. In 2018, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) eradicated 418,076 cannabis plants in Kentucky, about 9,356 plants per 100,000 people.
California, which legalized medical marijuana in 1996 and recreational marijuana in 2016, came in second place with 4,572 illegal cannabis plants per 100,000 people. The DEA confiscated over 1.8 million marijuana plants in the state last year.
Massachusetts and Wyoming tied for last place with zero cultivated plants seized by the DEA in 2018. Wyoming has not legalized marijuana, but Massachusetts legalized medical marijuana in 2012 and adult-use (also called recreational) cannabis in 2016.
Across the United States, the DEA seized 2.82 million cannabis plants in 2018, down from 3.38 million plants in 2017.
Kentucky also earned first place in the number of destroyed illegal grow sites in the country. 15 grow sites per 100,000 people were destroyed in Kentucky, more than double the next-highest state, West Virginia (7.4 per 100,000 people). West Virginia legalized medical marijuana in 2017 but has not legalized recreational use.
Delaware, DC, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming all had zero grow sites destroyed per 100,000 people. Except Wyoming, each of those states and DC have legalized medical marijuana, and 3 states and DC have legalized recreational use: Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont.
Despite not having any plants seized, Wyoming bulk-processed the most marijuana at 1,095 pounds per 100,000 people, 46.8% more than the next highest state, Arizona, which had 746 pounds per 100,000 people. Arizona legalized medical marijuana in 2010. American Addiction Centers theorized that the marijuana being bulk-processed in Wyoming might come from nearby states that have legalized marijuana, such as Colorado.
Delaware, DC, Illinois, Maine, Minnesota, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Vermont bulk-process the least amount of marijuana (0 pounds per 100,000 people). Among those states, only South Dakota and Tennessee have not legalized marijuana for medical use. Three of those states and DC also have recreational marijuana: Illinois, Maine, and Vermont.
The DEA’s Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program seized $52,308,982 in assets related to illicit cannabis plants last year.
33 states and DC have legal medical marijuana, and 11 states and DC have legal recreational marijuana.
Read what the 2020 candidates think about recreational marijuana legalization on our 2020 election site.

PLEASE CONTINUE READING…

TKP Thorne Peters–“I’m NOT crying – my eyes are running from the soapy tray.” May He Rest In Peace…

Thorne Peters 2019

On Sunday, November 3rd, at approximately 7 a.m., TKP Thorne Peters was found deceased in his single person cell, where he had spent 22 hours a day, in “protective custody”, since being committed to the Penal Farm in Memphis Tennessee in 2018.

The Detectives came to Linda Harrah’s home at approximately 2 p.m. and notified her of the situation.  I can’t even imagine what she must have felt when she heard those words, (of Thorne’s death) from them.  God Bless her.

He was 57 years old and while in prison had been writing a new book which he was going to publish upon his release from prison.  “Paper is hard to come by here”, he said to me in a letter.

  He always called me “Amore”, which at first I didn’t know what that meant, until I looked it up and found; Amore is the Italian word for “love”.  I will always hold that close to my heart.  He had written me several letters from prison, and they did not tell of any pleasantry at all.

The following is the last letter that I received from him, just a few days before his death.  Because of the circumstances I feel compelled to share it with everyone, especially his followers.

Felicitations Amore,

I have been crashed out hard over my latest victory.  I make the entire Courthouse shut down, and when the out of town Judge rules that ALL my evidence was on point and ALL 30 of the suspects were connected and therefore would have to take the Stand, they tunneled out of the Court to evade justice yet again.  11 years and the clock is ticking against me.

I had allowed myself a vision that when this trial began on December 9, 2019 and I lined up The Ministerz of Injustice for the big reveal that the evidence of their CRIMINAL CONSPIRACY of PUBLIC CORRUPTION would be so overwhelming in the glare of the WHITE HOT MEDIA SPOTLIGHT that would be forced to cover the story of the highest elected and appointed officials of law enforcement, politics, and the Judiciary taking the Stand to face dead bang, fatal blow evidence that my plight would reach the SAG and onto the Governor who would be forced to get involved and take a stand, and I could be pardoned by XMas.

Now the reality of my situation crashes in upon my head.  I am buried under this jail.  Instead of detonating a weapon of mass destruction in Court, I am reduced to taking pot shots with my blunderbust from deep within the bowels of the belly of the beast.

I have to remain focused and dedicated.  I cannot be disheartened.  These victories are not pyrrhic.  I’m not playing Chess.  This is Chinese GO.

I have to keep accumulating ground.  This battle brought me more ammunition to continue.  As it was in the Revolutionary War, we won very few battles.  The victory was keeping the Troops moving and maneuvering.   I had them in my sights.  I have to regroup and flank them again. 

I am reduced to a HUNGER STRIKE to demand the Authorities investigate this case.  The hilarity is that DA AMY (WEIRICH) has to sign off on a case of PUBLIC CORRUPTION in order for TBI (Tennessee Bureau of Investigation), to proceed.  ROUND ROBIN.

Had I been brought back to Court to hear the ADA concede, I would have smacked him across his dickhead as I walked out and declared EXTREME EMOTIONAL DISTRESS as a defense.  The CRIMINAL CONSPIRACY would be back on point and the DIRTY 30 would be called to the Stand.

So, I deal POT at the Courthouse and they won’t charge me with a FELONY to take to SCOTUS.  They ignore that and charge me with MISDEMEANOR POSSESSION OF POT as part of a felony FTA (Failure to appear), that they prosecute across the Courthouse for 18 months, and 7 Courts, until all 10 ditch, (Judges recuse themselves from the Case),

I kicked their asses!  I am left here to celebrate alone in my mausoleum with a plate of gruel served on a soapy tray.  At least I can use that as an excuse.

I’m NOT crying – my eyes are running from the soapy tray.

October 28, 2019 will mark the longest I’ve ever done, (in prison).  January 20, 2020 will be half-way-home-day.  I can’t comprehend this time frame.  So I put my heart into doing ONE MORE DAY – an hour for every minute…

MWAZ!

KP

TKP1

These words of TKP Thorne Peters will be the last I will ever read or hear from him.  It is sad.  It is sad that a State (or a Country) can be so corrupt as to let someone die under such horrid conditions in a single cage without any sympathy or concern for them what-so-ever.  Unfortunately Thorne is not the first person this has happened to and will not be the last.  This is what we have become.  A Country that cares not for it’s Citizens, but only for their power and greed and punitive rights.  Rights?  Yeah, their rights!  Not ours.

We will never know how this Case would have ended, or if the corruption would have been exposed.  We only know how it did end, with a great person, and Activist dying in the Shelby County Correctional System – The Penal Farm.

The Book which he was writing will eventually be published and much more information about his days in HELL will be exposed.  We may never find out the truth about HOW he ended up dying, alone, in that CAGE, in one night’s time. 

Of course an autopsy will be performed – probably already has been, but will we ever really know the truth?  Most likely not.  It      really doesn’t matter what they tell us such as “no foul play is         suspected”, because there isn’t a chance in HELL that they will         incriminate themselves in this matter. 

Thorne was a self proclaimed Atheist, however when I wrote him letters I would always tell him God Bless You.  I believe God has/will bless him as he was martyred for his beliefs that humans should be free and have unalienable rights.  Everything he did was done to help humanity.

Oddly enough, in another letter from Thorne recently he stated;

I have been in this cell for a year.  I have another 26 months to go…so far.  If I am convicted at my next trial I will receive 36 more months.  I will be in this cell for the duration.  The aspect of such a trial and tribulation may drive me to find God…at least until I get outta here! 

We had disagreements on how he presented himself to others, such as when he downed people for medical marijuana activism – But in fact he was NOT downing them at all – Just trying to get their attention as to what they were doing – giving their own unalienable rights away to legislation which was, is, and will continue to be the downfall of all Humanity – If we do not stop it.

We are all fighting in the same War!  We are all fighting for everyone, not just a few!  All humanity deserves the same unalienable rights!  We may have differing opinions on how to do this – but we all want the same outcome – FREEDOM!

On November 4th, one day after the fact, the Commercial Appeal published the story of his death;

Thorne Peters, ‘The Kingpin’ who waged war against pot laws, dies in Shelby County prison

In their article they wrote the following;

This year the appeals court affirmed his four-year sentence, citing among other things the following Facebook post in which Peters threatened to shoot people who came to take his drugs:

“I was just sitting around hoping some sorry want to be wigger, (expletive) was going to stop by with his partner to rob me of all this weed and money, I’m holding, so I can take target practice on their sorry asses. If you know anybody that wants to try me, let them know, I will be up all night, armed and dangerous.”

I was not there when this was said (written) so I have no way of knowing the actual thoughts behind it at the time, but I would never believe for a minute that he would in fact do such a thing.  I am from Kentucky, and many times we have, in general conversation, made similar remarks amongst ourselves, just in jest – but we would never actually do such a thing and I believe it was in extremely bad taste to even print such a quote.

I also do not believe that he had a gun at his disposal – in his home!

Thorne was living what he believed in and did it to the best of his ability – and he was crucified for it.  He never hurt anyone. 

He believed in Our freedom, and he fought for it until the end.

In closing, I leave you with this,

God Bless Thorne Peters!

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Lord, please Bless Ms. Linda Harrah during this most difficult time.

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Edwin Marshall Davidson

It is a sad day and with a heavy heart I recognize that my Friend in deed Thorne Peters has passed away while being a political prisoner in Tennessee. Thorne fought for everyone’s freedom not only his own. There is no freedom unless everyone is free. The cornerstone of freedom of his Teaching is “No Men’s Rea”….

No Men’s Rea Which is short for the Latin Phrase “Actus Reus No Facit Reum Nisi Men’s Sit Rea”.This translates to English to ” For the act to be guilty, the mind must be guilty., And for the mind to be guilty the act must be criminal with intent to do harm to a person, property or puppy” . In short, no guilty mind, no crime , no time.

We are free to do what we want as long as we don’t hurt anyone. Thorne Peters taught of No Men’s Rea, how legislation enslaves us, Freedom ends where legislation begins and if we go free they go broke, touched many.

Thorne was standing up against to Shelby County law enforcement and judges and the Ministers of Injustice that conspired to deny Thorne his Justice, due process and conspired to frame him for something he didn’t do. Thorne was fighting the system from the inside by using his malicious prosecution and making those whom conspired against him accountable by putting them on trial.

Shelby County did their best to silence him. Thornes teaching will never be silenced. For those not familiar and blessed to know Thorne you can go to ThornePeters.com .There you will see his videos, his music and poetry he wrote. . For those who know Thorne please consider going to ThornePeters.com and clicking on the Freedom Fund. Their is still a lot of work to do for freedom, extra costs, dogs to feed and we need to help Linda Harrah to keep those home fires burning.

Thorne just finished writing a book and I believe the title is Fully Free from Jail. I hope it gets published soon as those were his last words to us. .

I want to share a fond memory many of us have of Thorne. Thorne was prosecuted a convicted in a kangaroo court for a crime he didn’t commit. On the day he was to go to court for sentencing Thorne had a surprise. Thorne set up a table and opened up Tennessees first pot dispensary on the court house steps. We thought he would be arrested and charged immediately. Instead, Law enforcement was hiding. News cameras were their. Thorne sold pot on the court house steps without being arrested for about 2 hours. Thorne was never, charged or convicted of it. Proving No Men’s Rea works.

There is a video at ThornePeters.com . As a disciple of Thorne I vow to put forth his Teaching and continue the best I can by his example. The Bible says their is no greater love then a man lay down his life for a friend. Thorne did that for his friends in deed.We were all his “friends in deed”. I can still hear Thorne when he would say ” May you look inward, outward and upward to find Peace Love and Stars”.

I love you my Brother. Your brother and friend in deed!

Edwin Marshall Davidson


DO NOT FORGET TO VISIT THORNEPETERS.COM AND VIEW ALL THE INFORMATION ON THE CORRUPTION.  DONATIONS WILL BE MUCH APPRECIATED AS WELL.  ARRANGEMENTS HAVE YET TO BE MADE.

friends indeed button image map


https://www.commercialappeal.com/story/news/2019/11/04/thorne-peters-kingpin-dies-prison-shelby-county/4155825002/?fbclid=IwAR0o3R3GlbrdnMSIraRPtoKTRdeZdp9OQduakH_wTGwwbYrMIcYzvZpS40U

https://memphistruth.org/2019/04/18/amy-weirich-recidivist/

On Tuesday, November 5th, WE Must Be The Change In Kentucky! Vote HICKS/CORMICAN! This Is Why…

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On Tuesday, November 5th, the most important election in Kentucky in many years is about to happen!

I am not here to argue with anyone.  I am here to present the facts and my opinion as I see it.

Therefore,

First of all, you must vote to see change!  If you are eligible to Vote and are registered to do so – You must VOTE!  It is your Civic Duty.  And if you are eligible to vote but did not register, shame on you!

IF you want a change in your Government, you have to vote for the people who will CHANGE the way things are being done in           Kentucky!

You CANNOT vote for a Democrat or Republican and expect anything to change – only to get worse!  So if that is what you want, then go for it!

Otherwise, BE THE CHANGE that Kentucky must have in order to succeed!  John Hicks and Ann Cormican – Libertarian are running for the most important office in the State.  That is where we must start!  At the top!

On November 1st, Rep. Jason Nemes prefiled this years “medical marijuana bill” for Kentucky.  It will become House Bill 136 when the Session opens in January, and if it passes we will once again become Slaves to the system!  A few points on the Bill as written are:

*  Department for Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control to implement and regulate the medicinal marijuana program in Kentucky;

*  establish the Division of Medicinal Marijuana within the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control;

establish restrictions on the possession of medicinal marijuana by qualifying patients, visiting patients, and designated caregivers;

*  establish certain protections for cardholders;

*  establish professional protections for practitioners; to provide for the authorizing of practitioners by state licensing boards to issue written certifications for the use medicinal marijuana;

*  establish professional protections for attorneys;

* prohibit the possession and use of medicinal marijuana while operating a motor vehicle;

to prohibit smoking of medicinal marijuana;

* to permit an employer to restrict the possession and use of medicinal marijuana by an employee;

*  to require the department to implement and operate a registry identification card program; to establish requirements for registry identification cards; to establish registry identification card fees; to require the department to operate a provisional licensure receipt system; to establish the application requirements for a registry identification card; to establish when the department may deny an application for a registry identification card;

*  establish certain responsibilities for cardholders; to establish when a registry identification card may be revoked;

*  establish various cannabis business licensure categories; to establish tiering of cannabis business licenses; to require certain information be included in an application for a cannabis business license; to establish when the department may deny an application for a cannabis business license;

*  to establish rules for local sales, including establishing the process by which a local legislative body may prohibit the operation of cannabis businesses within its territory and the process for local ordinances and ballot initiatives;

*  establish technical requirements for cannabis businesses;

to establish limits on the THC content of medicinal marijuana that can be produced or sold in the state;

*  to establish requirements for cannabis cultivators, including cultivation square footage limits; to establish requirements for cannabis dispensaries; to establish requirements for safety compliance facilities; to establish requirements for cannabis processors; to establish procedures for the department to inspect cannabis businesses;

to exempt certain records and information from the disclosure under the Kentucky Open Records Act;

*  to establish that nothing in the bill requires government programs or private insurers to reimburse for the cost of use; to establish the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to establish the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; and to establish procedures for the distribution of local cannabis trust fund moneys;

*  create a new section of KRS Chapter 138 to establish an excise tax of 12% for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries; to require that 80% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the medicinal marijuana trust fund; to require that 20% of the revenue from the excise taxes be deposited into the local medicinal marijuana trust fund; amend KRS 342.815 to establish that the Employer’s Mutual Insurance Authority shall not be required to provide coverage to an employer if doing so would subject the authority to a violation of state or federal law;

Is this what you want?

The above is not all inclusive of the regulations, and they will no doubt change again when it is introduced in January.  Read the Bill!

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Please note that there are NO provisions for “smokable cannabis”, and NO mention of Children’s rights either.  There are NO provisions for growing your own plants, and this BILL in my opinion is being promoted for the Corporate/Pharmaceutical industry. 

Out of all the Bills previously submitted for “medical” or “adult use” Cannabis in Kentucky this is the worst one yet!  Do not fall for the legal lies which they are feeding you because they are preying on your fears for your Children’s needs, mostly.  The fact is, what M.D., is going to give you permission or a written statement that will give you the right to medicate your child with Cannabis?  The answer to that is virtually none, and if there was even one that WOULD do it there is no guarantee that you will be able to access that Physician!

The bill would prohibit the smoking of marijuana for medical purposes, but would allow other forms of consumption, such as edibles, oils and pills.  A 12% excise tax is proposed for cultivators and processors for selling to dispensaries.  LINK

I have consulted with several other Senior Activists in Kentucky over this issue and we all surmised basically the same opinions on the matter!  This is in NO way a repeal of prohibition of Cannabis and in no way will it ascertain our rights to this plant – medically or otherwise.  It is however, worth some $$$ to Corporate Ventures and Kentucky Government as it now stands!

In my opinion, for those parents who have seriously ill children in need of this medicine they need to consider moving to a honest medical cannabis State such as Colorado or elsewhere.  For those who are unable to do this due to financial situations we must set up a fund to enable them to do so.  I can honestly say that if it were my child that is exactly what I would do!  Not because I want to leave my home in Kentucky, but because my Childs life is more important and I would be compelled to do so, IF John Hicks and Ann Cormican are not elected. 

The “Undergreen Railroad” is one such organization.  I will look into this organization further, especially if Hicks/Cormican are not elected, because you all are going to need it!

Finally, we come to the third candidate in the governor’s race. Libertarian John Hicks. John is a Vietnam Era Army veteran, a former school teacher, and currently an IT consultant. He has a BA Degree in Political Science and History. He has never held political office, but ran previously for State Representative (District 43) in 2018. John is pro-life and believes government should stay out of personal issues.
John supports the legalization of marijuana, expanded gaming, and the development of hemp as sources of additional state revenue (better than raising taxes!). He also believes that the best way to compensate for budget shortfalls is to reduce the size of government and streamlining operations. Additionally, John Hicks supports election reform; specifically by introducing run-offs, using ranked choice voting, proportional representation, multi member districts which would end partisan gerrymandering.
   LINK

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Manages Kentucky Open Source Society

John Hicks IS qualified for the position of Governor, as he IS ONE OF US!  He will bring us liberty and fight for OUR rights as Kentucky Citizens!

We need to show the entire Country what Kentucky can do when faced with such a dire situation – It’s not just about Cannabis – It is about Liberty and  Justice for All!

Please make the right choice for our State, our Families, our Children, and our Country!

Do not condemn Our State once again!

God Bless You All

smkrider

11/3/2019

https://www.facebook.com/HicksForKentucky/

https://www.facebook.com/hicksforkygov/

https://www.facebook.com/jason.nemes.1/posts/3321913687848659

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=3321910424515652&set=a.170767459629980&type=3&theater

https://legislature.ky.gov/Legislators/Pages/Legislator-Profile.aspx?DistrictNumber=33

https://apps.legislature.ky.gov/record/20rs/prefiled/BR366.html?fbclid=IwAR1A_cH3LEwMDixbcMN1o5u5XrRB-gFQZM4qmAaZXrIZa9aYUjEjmeA4vgE

https://www.facebook.com/johnrhicks?__tn__=%2Cd-]-h-R&eid=ARANzRCvypZKWWjzlKWQixSeBkF7a97sNZINNMIU-dY8JZZgHxFfuPbr1urQ6ro5Ui9nfNGocWfFP88Z

http://www.anotheropinionblog.com/2019/11/the-2019-kentucky-election-main-event.html?fbclid=IwAR2vzCm-4QDieeyVDP2XKDUtgvSHkcivekuOVKzOCd2JiYaFJEGca1AFr7o

https://www.wlky.com/article/kentucky-lawmaker-prefiles-bill-to-legalize-medical-marijuana/29669383?fbclid=IwAR2a8kMPicpnBgioaeKcHaEoYxiuBNGC3bzvwhGsb10DS7DoVeHIMu3wBD0#

http://www.ladybud.com/2014/01/14/the-undergreen-railroad-helping-patients-relocate-for-cannabis-access/

Jesse Ventura Considering Presidential Run

jesse ventura 2019

Jesse Ventura is considering running for President as an independent. “I have that voice in the back of my head that says to me, ‘if not to me, then who?'”

Ventura gave his first American TV interview in 3 years to “The Issue Is: with Elex Michaelson.” He says only a 3rd party candidate could truly unite our polarized country. When he was elected governor of Minnesota, Ventura said Donald J. Trump reached out to him & they were friends. Now, he’s not a fan of President Trump as commander in chief. “The first night of boot camp, there’s one person who will break down, wet their pants, cry for their mom…that’s Donald Trump.” Ventura talked about cannabis, climate change, wrestling, and more in this unedited, in depth interview.

What do you think?

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